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1 



-*Ncl895:- 



CONSTITUTION 



AND 



PLAYING RULES 



OK THE 



RATIONAL LEAGUE 



AND 



AMERICAN /cSSOCIATION 



OF 



PROFESSIONAL BA5E BALL ClCJPS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 



Published by A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

126-130 Nassau Street, New York. 147-146 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

1316 Chestnut Street, PHILADELPHIA. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OP A BALL FIELD. 




Note. For Specifications see Rules from No. 2 to No. ia. 



CONSTITUTION 



national [sap and pen [siiaii 

OF 

Professional Base Ball Clubs. 
1895. 



NAME. 

Section I. (i) This Association shall be called The Na- 
tional League and American Association of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs. 

objects. 

Sec. 2. The objects of this League are : 

(i) To perpetuate base ball as the National game of the 
Uniled States, and to surround it with such safeguards as to 
warrant for the future absolute public confidence in its integ- 
rity and methods. 

(2) To protect and promote the mutual interests of profes- 
sional base ball clubs and professional base ball players, and 

(3) To establish and regulate the base ball championship of 
the United States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 
SEC. 3. This League shall consist of twelve clubs (the mem- 
bership of which shall not be increased cr diminished for a period 
of ten years) located in the following named cities, to-wit : 
Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash- 
ington, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Louisville, Cleveland 
and Chicago, or such other clubs as may, from time to time, be 
elected to membership as may be hereinafter provided for, but 
in no event shall there he more than one club in any city. 

WITHDRAWAL PROM MEMBERSHIP. 
SEC. 4. Any club member of this League finding itself un- 
able to meet the obligations it has assumed shall have the 
right to ask the League for permission to dispose of its rights 
and franchises as a member of this League to some other city 



4 CONSTITUTION. 

or organization. In the event of this League giving its con- 
sent to the acceptance of such city or organization to member- 
ship, such club member shall be admitted to membership, 
providing said club shall assume, together with the rights and 
franchises of said retiring club, all the liabilities, responsibili- 
ties and obligations entered into by said retiring club, as a 
member of this League. Provided, however, and it must be 
so understood by the retiring and the new member, that the 
retiring club shall not be relieved or released from any con- 
tracts, responsibilities or obligations entered into by it to this 
League until all of said contracts, responsibilities and obliga- 
tions have been fully paid and determined by the club accept- 
ing its membership, rights, franchises, etc. 

ADMISSION TO MEMBERSHIP. 

SEC. 5. No club shall be admitted unless it shall first have 
delivered to the Secretary of the League a written application 
for membership, signed by its President and Secretary, accom- 
panied by documents showing that such club bears the name of 
the city in which it is located, and that it is regularly organ- 
ized and officered, and, where the State law permits it, chart- 
ered. Such application shall at once be transmitted by the 
Secretary to the Board of Directors, who shall immediately 
investigate and report upon said application, said report to be 
communicated to the League through the Secretary. 

Sec. 6. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisite for 
election. 

IN REGARD TO VACANCIES. 
SEC. 7. In case a vacancy occurs in the membership of this 
organization during the championship season the President 
shall nominate to all the clubs all applicants for membership, 
and the vote thereon maybe taken by telegraph or mail, as 
occasion may require, and a majority of all the clubs will be 
required to admit any applicant to membership. Such mem- 
bership, however, shall continue only until the next annual 
meeting, but such club shall be subject to all the rules and 
requirements of this organization. 

TERMINATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 

Sec 8. The membership of any club may be terminated — 

(1) By resignation duly accepted by a three-fourths vote of 
all the clubs in meeting duly convened, as provided in Section 4. 

(2) Failure to present its nine at the time and place agreed 
upon to play any championship game, uuless caused by un- 
avoidable accident in traveling. 



CONSTITUTION. 5 

(3) Allowing open betting or pool selling upon its grounds or 
in any building owned or occupied l>y it. 

(4) Playing any game of ball with a club that is disqualified 
or ineligible under this Constitution. 

(5) Offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to lose any 
game of ball, or failing to immediately expel any player who 
shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or 
attempting to lose any game of ball, or of being interested in 
any pool or wager thereon. 

(6) Disbandment of its organization or team during the 
championship season. 

(7) Failing or refusing to fulfil its contractual obligations. 

(8) Failing or refusing to comply with any lawful require- 
ment of the Board of Directors. 

(9) Wilfully violating any provision of this Constitution or 
the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance thereof. 



THE KXl'ULSION OF CLUBS. 

Sec. 9. To carry into effect the provisions of Section 8 of 
this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such section 
must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall at 
once notify, by mail or telegraph, the party charged with the 
specified default or offense, inquiring whether any dispute 
exists as to the facts alleged. In case the facts are disputed, 
the Hoard shall, after due notice, try the case under such regu- 
lations as they may prescribe, and their finding shall be final 
and conclusive on all parties except in case of expulsion, when 
such finding shall be forwarded to each club, which shall trans- 
mit to the Secretary written ballots "For Expulsion" or 
" Against Expulsion "; and if all clubs vote " For Expulsion " 
the Secretary shall notify all clubs of the forfeiture of member- 
ship of the party charged. 

DUES AMI ASSESSMENTS. 

SEC, 10. (I) Each chili shall pay to the Secretary on or before 
the first day of April of each year the sum of $100 as annual 
dues; and such other sums as (torn time to time may be as- 
sessed for the payment of salaries of officers and umpires, and 
for such other expenses as may be incurred by order of this 
League or the Board of Directors, Also all fines and penalties 
imposed by said League or its Board of Directors upon a club 
or upon any club officer, player, manager, scorer, or other em- 
ploye when so levied and imposed by virtue of and in accord- 
ance with the provisions of this Constitution and the playing 
rules of this League. 



6 CONSTITUTION. 

THE IMPOSING <>!•' KINKS. 
(2) Upon conviction of any of the offenses prescribed in Sec- 
tion 8, as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu of expulsion, 
impose such a fine as is in their judgment commensurate with 
the injury; which fine may include a penalty payable to any 
other club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages sustained for 
such violation of this Constitution, or of the legislation or con- 
tracts made in pursuance thereof. 

OFFICERS. 

Sec. ii. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a 
President, Secretary, Treasurer and Hoard of Directors. The 
President shall be ex-oflicio Chairman of the Board of Direct- 
ors. He shall report to the Board of Directors any violations 
of the provisions of this Constitution that may come to his 
knowledge. He shall be the sole interpreter of the playing 
rules during the championship season, fie shall preside at all 
the meetings of the League, and at the annual meeting of the 
League shall act as a schedule committee. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, resig- 
nation, or removal, the Board of Directors shall within thirty 
days elect a President. 

SEC. 12. The Board of Directors shall consist of the Presi- 
dent and six other members, to be chosen at the annual meeting 
by ballot, three of whom shall represent the Eastern clubs and 
three the Western clubs. 

QUALIEICATIONS OF OFFICERS. 
SEC. 13. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who 
is not an actual member of the club he represents, nor shall 
any club, under any circumstances, be represented by more 
than one person on the Board. 

DUTIES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Sec. 14. The Board shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League, and 
shall be individually answerable to the League for the faithful 
discharge of their trust. 

Sko. 15. The Board shall meet annually on the morning of 
the first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November, 
at 9 o'clock, at the place where the annual meeting of the 
League is to be held, but may hold special meetings whenever 
urgent necessity may require. 

Sic. 16. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all 
their doings, and present the same in writing to the League at 



CONSTITUTION. 



its annual meeting, which report shall, if accepted, be Bled 
with the Secretary, together with all official papers, docu- 
ments and property, which may have come into their posses- 
sion by virtue of [heir office. 

VACANCY IN THE BOARD. 

SEC. 17. In case of vacancy in the Hoard by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Di- 
rector, the club of which he was a member at the time he was 
chosen shall designate his successor, and at once notify the 
Secretary. But if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, 
disbanding, or disqualification of a club represented on the 
Hoard, the Board may fill the vacancy by election in the same 
manner as provided for the election of Directors in Section 12. 
THE SECRETARY'S DOT IKS. 

St'.r. iS. The Secretary shall be tlie Treasurer of the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League; 
receive all dues, fees and assessments, make such payments 
as shall be ordered by the Board or by the vote of the League, 
and render annually a report of his accounts, and shall give 
such bond, with approved sureties, as the Board may require. 

SEC. 19. The Secretary shall have the custody and care of 
the official records and papers of the League ; shall keep a 
true record of all meetings of the League and the Board ; shall 
issue all official notices, and attend to the necessary corre- 
spondence ; he shall prepare and furnish such reports as may 
be called for by the Board, and shall be entitled to such books, 
stationery, blanks and materials as the actual duties of his 
office may require. 

Sec. 20. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infrac- 
tions of the rules and regulations of the League that may come 
under his notice, and shall make a report on the same to the 
Board at its next meeting. 

Sec. 21. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the 
Board, by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for 
all traveling expenses actually incurred by him in the service of 
the League ; and the Board may exact from him such guaran- 
tees for the faithful performance of his duties as they would 
deem for the interest and safety of the League. At the expira- 
tion of his term of office he shall account for and deliver up fo 
the Board all the property and papers which may have come 
into his hands by virtue of his office. 

LAWS GOVERNING EMPLOYES. 

lNDIVIIlWAI. CLUB CONTROL. 

SEC. 22. Each club belonging to this League shall have the 



8 



COISSTvTUTION. 



right to regulate its own affairs, to establish its own rules, and 
tu discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own manager, play- 
ers or other employes, and these powers shall not be limited to 
cases of dishonest play or open insubordination, but shall in- 
clude all questions of carelessness, indifference or other conduct 
of the player that may be regarded by the club as prejudicial to 
its interests ; not in conflict with any provision of this Constitu- 
tion; or the playing rules of this League. The President of the 
League shall have power, upon proper proof, to inflict a line for 
any such offenses not exceeding $200, which fine can only be 
remitted by the Board of Directors. 

CI. I 1 II TERRITORIAL RIGHTS. 

Si.c. 23. Every club of this League shall have exclusive con- 
trol of the city in which it is located and of the territory sur- 
rounding such city, to the extent of five miles in every direc- 
tion from its corporate limits, and no visiting League club 
shall, under any circumstances, except with the consent of the 
local League club, until all League championship games on 
that ground shall have been finished, be allowed to play any 
club in such territory other than the League club therein 
located, nor shall a visiting League club play any game in 
April with any non-League club within said five miles from the 
corporate limits of the city in which the League club is located, 
without the consent of the local League club. 

MODE OF CONTRACT. 
Sec. 24. Contracts between a club and its players may be 
either by telegram or writing, to be followed within thirty days 
thereafter by a contract in the form approved and promulgated 
by the Secretary to all the clubs. 

ON RESERVATION OF PLAYERS. 
SEC, 25. Each club a member of this League shall be entitled 
to the right of reservation. On or before the 30th day of Sep- 
tember in each year each club shall transmit to the Secretary a 
reserve list of the players whose services it desires to retain, 
then under contract to the said club for the current or for any 
succeeding season or seasons, ami in addition thereto the names 
of such players reserved in any prior annual list who have re- 
fused to contract with said club. Such players, together wit It 
all others thereafter to be regularly contracted with, shall be 
ineligible to contract with any other club in this League except 
as hereinafter provided. No club shall have the right to re- 
serve any player when in arrears of salary to him. The Secre- 
tary shall promulgate such lists. 



CONSTITUTION. 



MAKING CONTRACTS. 

Sec. 26. All contracts between clubs of this League and 
individual players shall be made through the Secretary, or his 
duly authorized agent. This League shall adopt such form of 
contract as it may deem best for the protection of the rights of 
the parties thereto. All contracts must be approved by the 
Secretary, and duly promulgated by him. Provided, clubs be- 
longing to this League may contract with players for any period 
of time that may be mutually agreed upon. The ten days re- 
lease provided for in the seventeenth paragraph of the League 
form of contract shall begin to run from the time of notice 
thereof received by the Secretary of the League, who shall, at 
once, promulgate the same to all club members. At the expir- 
ation of said ten days the player so released shall be eligible to 
contract with the releasing club, or any other club member, 

EXPULSION OK PLAYERS. 
Sec. 27. Any player, while under contract with or reserva- 
tion by a League club, who shall, without the consent of such 
club, enter the service of any other club in any capacity, shall 
be liable to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club 
releases a manager or player without notice, or gives him ten 
days' notice of release in accordance with the terms of his con- 
tract, and whenever it Suspends or expels a manager or player, 
that club shall at once notify the Secretary of this League, 
stating, in case of release, the date when the same takes effect, 
and in case of suspension or expulsion, the cause thereof. 

NEGOTIATING FOR SERVICES. 

Sic. 28. No player, without the consent of the club with 
which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter into nego- 
tiations with any other club for future services, but if such 
consent be obtained, a player may negotiate for his release, anil 
offer a money consideration therefor, which may be accepted 
by the said releasing club. 

EFFECT OF CLUB DISBANDMENT. 

SEC. 29. The disbandment of a League club or its with- 
drawal from or loss of League membership shall operate as a 
release of its players from contract and reservation willi said 
club, but the right to contract with and reserve said players 
shall be subject to transfer to such other club as the League 
may designate after acceptance of their said services. 

ON SUSPENSION OK PLAYERS. 

Sic. 30. No manager or player who has been suspended or 
expelled from a League club shall at any time thereafter be 



10 



CONSTITUTION. 



allowed to play with or serve in any capacity any League club 
(either the one expelling him or any other) unless the term of 
suspension by the club has expired, or, upon his appeal to this 
League, such expulsion or suspension shall have been set aside. 

FLAYING WITH OUTSIDE CLUBS. 
SEC. 31. No game of base ball shall be played between a 
League club and any other club that has been expelled from 
membership in this League. No game of ball shall lie played 
between a League club and any other club employing or pre- 
senting in its nine a player expelled or under suspension from 
the League or otherwise rendered ineligible by this League or 
a club member thereof. A violation of this section shall for- 
feit the game in favor of the non-offending club, and subject it 
to such fine as the Board of Directors may impose. 

<« CROOKEDNESS " AM) IIS PENALTIES. 
SEC. 32. Any person who shall be proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the playing rules, or 
who, while acting as umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution, or of the playing rules adopted hereunder, may 
be forever disqualified by the President of the League from acting 
as umpire, manager, flayer or in any other capacity in any game 
of ball participated in by a League club. 



THE UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
THE STAFF OF UMPIRES. 
Sec. 33. A staff of League Umpires shall be selected by the 
Secretary before the opening of the regular season. 

(1) They shall be paid such salaries and allowed such ex- 
penses as may be mutually agreed upon by contract between 
them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the approval 
of the Hoard of Directors of the League. 

(2) They shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom they will receive all assignments to duty 
and all instructions regarding the interpretation of the playing 
rules, and the Secretary shall prescribe a proper uniform fur 
them, all parts of which shall be worn while officiating as 
Umpire. 

THEIR DOT IKS. 

(3) In the event of the failure of an Umpire to umpire a game 
assigned to them, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 
vide a substitute to umpire such game, and in such case there 
shall be deducted from the next annual payment to the League 






CONSTITUTION. 



II 



Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game assigned to 
him, which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire. 

(4) It shall be the duty of an Umpire to enforce the rules as 
they are written, regardless of his personal opinion as to their 
merit. This shall especially apply to Rule 52, and Section 3 of 
Rule 54, and Section I, Rule 59, and in the event of his failure 
to enforce these rules he shall be fined $25 for the first offense 
and f 50 for the second offense, upon the sworn statement of the 
Captain of one of the opposing teams and two reputable wit- 
nesses, which affidavits must be forwarded to the League Sec- 
retary within twenty-four hours of the offense. 

(5) It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as 
umpire for any championship game such League Umpire or 
substitute as the Secretary shall assign to such game, and only 
in the event of the failure of the League Umpire or substitute 
so assigned to appear at the hour appointed for the beginning 
of such game, shall the duty devolve upon the home club to 
designate an Umpire for such game. 

THEIR REMOVAL. 

• 

(6) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time, and in the event of the resignation, re- 
moval or expulsion of any League Umpire the Secretary shall 
have power to appoint a suitable person to fill the vacancy thus 
created. 

CAUSE FOR EXPULSION. 

Sec. 34. Any League Umpire who shall in the judgment of 
the 1'resident of the League be guilty of ungentlemanly con- 
duct, or of selling or offering to sell a game of which he is 
Umpire, shall thereupon be removed from his official capacity 
and placed under the same disabilities inflicted upon expelled 
players by the Constitution of this League. 

SETTLEMENT OK CLUB DISPUTES. 

THE GOVERNING TRIBUNAL. 

SEC. 35- The Hoard of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between clubs ; the facts to be submitted, 
and the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the 
Hoard shall prescribe in each case. The finding of the Board 
shall be final, and under no circumstances shall be reconsid- 
ered, reopened or inquired into, either by the League or any 
subsequent Hoard. 

Sec. 36. The Hoard shall at once consider any complaint 
preferred by a club against a manager or player of another 
club (prior to the expiration of the championship season) for 



12 CONSTITUTION. 

conduct in violation of any provision of this Constitution, or 
prejudicial to thj good repute of the game of base ball, and 
shall have power to require the club to which such player or 
manager may belong to discipline him, and upon repetition of 
such offense to expel him. Provided that such complaint be 
preferred in writing, giving such particulars as may enable 
the Board to ascertain all the facts, and be transmitted to the 
Secretary, by whom it shall at once be referred to the Board. 

ADJUDICATING COMPLAINTS I1Y PLAYERS. 
Sec. 37. In case a player under contract with a League club 
shall during a current season prefer a complaint in writing to 
the Secretary of the League against such a club, alleging that 
such club is in arrears to him for salary for more than fifteen 
days after such salary became due on account of such contract, 
the Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of 
such complaint, and require an answer thereto. On receipt of 
such answer, or if one week shall have elapsed without the re- 
ceipt of an answer, the Secretary shall refer the paper in the 
case to the Board of Directors through its Chairman, and 
should the Board find the player's complaint sustained, they 
shall require the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its mem- 
bership, to pay to the player forthwith the full amount ascer- 
tained to be due him. Provided that should the player refuse 
to serve the club pending action by the Board on his complaint, 
he will thereby forfeit the benefits of the award, and in such 
case the Board shall revoke his award. 

THE COURT OF APPEAL. 

Sec. 38. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal of the 
hearing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been 
expelled, suspended, or disciplined by his club. The matter 
shall be proceeded with in the following manner: Such person 
shall, within thirty days after the date of the expulsion, sus- 
pension, or discipline file with the Secretary a written state- 
ment of his defense, accompanied by a request that an appeal 
be allowed him, The Secretary shall notify the club of the re- 
quest for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy <>l 
the appeal, and at the next annual meeting the club, by its 
duly authorized representative, and the appellant in person, by 
attorney or by written statement, shall aappear before the 
Hoard with their testimony. The Hoard shall impartially hear 
the matter and render their decision, which shall be final and 
forever binding on both club ami player. 

Skc. 39, No Director shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 



CONSTITUTION. 13 

Sec. 40. Any expense of trials or arbitrations shall be borne 
equally by the parties to the controversy. 

ADOPTING PLAYING RULES. 

Sec. 41. This League shall adopt such playing rules as it 
deems best for the conduct of its business. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP RULES. 

THE COMPETING CLUIiS. 
Sec. 42. The championship of the United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the clubs com- 
posing the League. 

DURATION OF THE SEASON. 

Sec. 43. The championship season shall extend from such 
date in April or May to such date in September as the League 
may determine at its stated or special meeting. 

CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

Sec. 44. Every game played between two clubs from the 
commencement of the championship season to the completion 
of the championship series between such clubs shall be a game 
for the championship, and no League club shall lend or ex- 
change players to or with each other for any game played dur- 
ing the championship season. Any violation of this section 
shall subject each offender to a fine of $100. 

NUMBER OF GAMES. 

Sec 45. Each club shall play twelve or more championship 
games with every other club, but a tie or draw game or a game 
prevented by rain shall be played off on the same grounds on a 
succeeding open date within the dates of the same schedule 
si/ries between such clubs, or any succeeding series. An open 
date succeeding any series of games between two clubs shall be 
considered as belonging to and within the dates of the preced- 
ing series, providing such day is not absolutely required by 
either club to meet its next schedule appointment. In case 
there is no open date on same ground, such game may be 
played off on the grounds of the other club on an open date. 

Sec. 46. Each club shall have half of the championship 
series of games with every other club played on its grounds, 
except as otherwise provided in Section 45, and in all the de- 
tails of such games thai do not involve the rights of the visiting 
club under the playing rules, but relate solely to such games 
as attractive exhibitions to the patrons of the home club, the 
visiting club shall defer to the wishes of the home club, pro- 



14 



CONSTITUTION. 



vided, nevertheless, that the home club shall not be permitted 
to change the usual hour for the commencement of scheduled 
games in its particular city more than thirty (30) minutes with- 
out first having obtained the consent of the visiting club 
thereto, under a penalty to the visiting club of $500. And the 
visiting club shall furnish to a person designated by the home 
club the batting order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morning 
of the day of each game, or the evening previous, if requested. 
Tn case of the failure of any visiting club to furnish the batting 
order of its nine as herein stipulated, it shall forfeit the sum of 
$10, which amount shall be immediately transmitted to the 
Secretary of the League, upon the receipt of notice from him of 
the infliction of such fine, which notice shall be given by the 
Secretary upon receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the manager 
and captain of the visiting club with a list of the batting order 
before the commencement of the game under similar penalties 
for default as herein prescribed. The visiting club shall have 
the right to practise its nine on the grounds of the home club 
between II and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit during 
the championship season. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE. 

SEC. 47. All championship games shall be arranged in a 
written schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, and re- 
ported to and adopted by the League by a three-fourths vote 
before the beginning of the championship season. The sched- 
ule shall provide for an equal number of return games, and 
specify the date of each game and the date of each series of 
games. No date in said schedule shall subsequently be changed, 
except (1) by written agreement of two clubs from a date fixed 
by the schedule for a game between such clubs to another day 
prior to the first and subsequent to the last date of the same 
schedule series between such clubs ; or (2) as provided in Sec 
45 '• or (3) D y tne written consents of three-fourths of all the 
League clubs. 

Any club or clubs violating this section shall be amenable to 
a penalty of $1,000. This to apply to the clubs so playing. 
Said penalty to be paid within forty-eight hours to the Treas- 
urer of the National League and American Association, or if 
not so paid to be withheld from any funds to their credit in the 
hands of the Treasurer. All games played in violation of this 
section shall not count in the championship series. 

THE ADMISSION PEES AM) RECEIPTS. 

Sec 48. The general admission fee to all championship 



i -i INSTITUTION. 



15 



games shall be fifty cents (50), but each club shall designate 
a part of its grounds, ami, provide seats thereon, the admission 
fee to which shall be twenty-five (25) cents, and all division of 
percentages shall be made on the basis of fifty (50) cents, ex- 
cept as to that part of the grounds the admission fee to which 
is fixed at twenty-five (25) cents, and as to such part of said 
grounds all division of percentage shall be on the basis of 
twenty-five cents. 

At the conclusion of each championship game the home club 
shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and shall 
transmit by mail to the President or other designated official of 
the visiting club a duplicate of the same) a statement of the 
receipts of said game, which must include all fifty-cent and 
twenty-five cent admissions, and shall pay to the visiting club 
fifty per centum of said receipts. 

Sk.c. 49. Out of the funds of this League now in the hands of 
the Secretary he shall create a Sinking Fund not to exceed 
$12,000, which shall be invested in Government bonds. All 
other funds shall be placed in the treasury to meet current 
expenses. 

THE TURNSTILE COUNT. 

Sec. 50. The number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use of the necessary number of self- 
registering turnstiles, the arms of which shall extend within 
four inches of a dividing partition, the keys of which shall be 
delivered to the agent of the visiting club before the opening of 
the grounds for each game; and said agent of the visiting club 
shall have full access to such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed until after the close of the seventh 
innings, and in case a carriage gate is used a ticket for each 
person admitted through such gale shall at once be delivered to 
the agent of the visiting club. No person shall be admitted 
free to the grounds during or prior to such game or the hour 
appointed therefor, excepting only players of contesting clubs, 
policemen in uniform, the umpires and the necessary employes 
of the home club. The visiting club shall have the right to 
accept the turnstile count for each and all games, or to count 
all tickets. Each club shall be required to use for its business 
a substantial pasteboard ticket, which can be readily counted. 

DIAGRAM OF GROUNDS. 

Sec. 51. No club shall be allowed to have more than fonr 
entrances to its grounds except upon holidays, but for all such 
days the visiting club shall be given at least ten days' notice of 
the whole number and location of additional entrances ; pro- 



[6 



CONSTITUTION. 



vidcd, however, emergency gates may be opened by consent of 
the visiting club if occasion requires. 

STOPPING PLAY TO CATCH TRAINS. 

Sec. 52. On any day when either club is required to leave a 
city to, or in order to reach another city, where it is scheduled 
to play its next game, the home club shall be compelled upon 
proper notice by the visiting club to begin the game three 
hours anil a half before the time of the departure of the last 
train by means of which either club can reach the next sched- 
uled point in time. And either club may leave the field at any 
time within one hour of said train time without forfeiting any 
rights or priveleges, provided five innings have been played, 
and the Umpire shall be the sole judge of the time. 

GIVING OUT RAIN CHECKS. 

SEC. 53. In the event of a game being stopped by rain before 
completion of five innings, the home club may issue rain 
checks, good for any succeeding game. If rain checks are so 
issued the visiting club shall not be entitled to its percentage 
of receipts ; but if rain checks are not issued, the visiting club 
shall be entitled to its percentage of receipts, precisely as if the 
game had been fully played. 

ON FORFEITED GAMES. 

Sec. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — to 
count in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none 
— in case where the Umpire in any championship game shall 
award the game to such club on account of the violation by the 
contesting club of any section of this Constitution or of any 
playing rule ; and in the event of such forfeiture being caused 
by the withdrawal of the players during the progress of the 
game, or by a failure to report with its team at the time fixed 
for the game, unless written notice has been received from the 
home club that the game cannot be played, then such forfeiting 
club shall incur a penalty of one thousand dollars, which shall 
be payable to the Secretary of the League within ten days 
thereafter for the use and benefit of the non-offending club, but 
said fine maybe remitted or modified upon appeal to and a 
hearing by the Hoard of Directors. In addition to the penalty 
above referred to, the captain or manager, or the person in 
charge of the offending team, and responsible for the team 
leaving the field, shall incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
which shall be paid within live days to the Secretary of the 
League, said penalty not to be remitted under any circum- 
stances. 



CONSTITUTION. 



17 



ON DRAWN GAMES. 

Sec. 55. Drawn, tie and postponed games shall not count in 
the series as games (but any game of not less than five innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if 
possible, as provided in Section 45. If they cannot be played 
off, as therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, 
if sufficient time exists before the close of the season. 

I luulile games for one admission shall not be permitted until 
the last schedule series, u lien they shall be compulsory to 
the extent ol playing oil all postponed, tie or drawn games. 

WINNING THE PENNANT. 

Sec. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest per- 
centage of games in the championship series, shall be declared 
the champion club of the United States for the season in which 
such games were played. In the event that two or more clubs 
shall have won the same percentage of games, then the Board 
shall at once arrange a special series of three games between 
any two of such clubs, such games to be played at th close of 
the championship season, and the games so played shah be 
included in the championship record, and counted in determin- 
ing the award of the championship, In such case only the 
provisions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 
cording as championship games, games played after the expira- 
tion of the championship season, shall have no effect. The 
emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the National 
colors) to COSt not le^s than one hundred dollars ($100). It 
shall be inscribed with the motto, "Champion Base Ball Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the year 
in which the title was won, and the champion club shall be 
entitled to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing year. 

DECIDING THE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Sec 57. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after nery match game played for 
the championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to 
the Secretary of the League a statement containing the full 
score of the game, according to the system specified in the 
playing rules, the dale, the place where played, the names of 
the clubs and Umpire, provided that no tie or drawn game 
shall be considered a game for any purpose except the averages; 
and provided, further, that in any case where the Secretary 
shall not receive the score of a championship game within five 
days after the playing of such game, the club whose duty it is 



18 



CONSTITUTION. 



to forward such score shall pay to the League the sum of $2 a-; 
the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabu- 
lar statement of the games won and lost by each club, accord- 
ing to the statement so sent him, which statement shall be the 
sole evidence in the matter, and submit the same, with the 
statements so sent him, to the Board, who shall make the 
award in writing and report the same to the League at its an- 
nual meeting. 

Tn making the award the Hoard shall consider : 

(1) The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

(2) Forfeited games. 

(3) Games participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, 
disbanded, or forfeited their membership without completing 
their championship series with all other League clubs ; such 
games shall be counted to the following extent : The Hoard 
shall ascertain the least number of championship games played 
by such club with any club remaining in the League, and shall 
from the first game participated in during the championship 
series by such retired club, count in the series of each League 
club a similar number of games, and all other games partici- 
pated in by such retired club shall not be counted in the cham- 
pionship series. Provided, that if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
out entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sec. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the first Wednesday after the second Tuesday in November of 
each year, at 12 o'clock noon, and at such places as shall have 
been determined by a vote at the previous annual meeting. 

CLUB REPRESENTATION. 
Sec. 59. At such meeting each club shall be represented and 
shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have in addition 
thereto any of its officers or ex-officers present at such meeting ; 
but no club shall be permitted to send as a representative any 
person under contract or engagement as a ball player or man- 
ager, and belonging to the nine of said club in such capacity. 
They shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary 
of their club, showing their authority to act, but no club shall 
have more than one vote. 

THE LEAGUE SESSIONS. 

Sec. 60. This League may, upon a majority vote of its mem- 
bers, elect to go into executive session for the transaction of its 



CONSTITUTION. 19 

business, and during such sessions no club shall be entitled to 
more than two (2) representatives. 

SPECIAL MEETINGS. 

Sec. 61. Special meetings may be called by the President 
of this League on his own option or on the written call of six 
clubs. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

SEC. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall consti- 
tute :\ quorum for the transaction of business, but a less num- 
ber may adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

Sec. 63. The following shall be the order of business, unless 
suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club members: 

1. Reading Minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Report of Committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 

6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of Officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a three-fourths rule of the League at any annual 
meeting;, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. Provided, 
however, that this section and Sections 3, 8, 48 and 49 shall 
not be altered or amended except by a unanimous vote of this 
League. 

(2) Any section of this Constitution may be suspended or its 
provision made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL 
BASE BALL ASSOCIATIONS. 

This Agreement between the National League and American 
Association of Professional Base Kail Clubs, hereinafter desig- 
nated as the party of the first part, such eligible professional base 
ball associations as shall, with the assent of the National Board 
of Professional Base Ball Associations, be admitted to Class A 
and become signatory parties hereto — hereinafter designated as 
the parties of the second part, and such other eligible professional 
base ball associations as shall, with the assent of said National 
Board, be admitted to Class Hand become signatory parties hereto 
— hereinafter designated as the parties of the third part. Wit- 
nesseth, That 

i. This instrument shall be called the National Agreement of 
Professional Base Ball Associations. 

2. The general enforcement of this Agreement, the protection 
of rights thereunder, the determination of all controversies as 
hereinafter provided, and generally the regulation of all things 
within the scope of this Agreement, are each and severally con 
ferred upon and committed to a Board to be known as "The 
National Board of Professional Base Ball Associations." This 
Board shall consist 'of three delegates, representing the party of 
the first part, and one delegate representing each of the parties of 
the second part, elected each year by their respective constituent 
associations. The officers of the Board shall consist of a chair- 
man, secretary and treasurer, which offices may be filled by either 
one, two or three persons. All officers, assistants, agents or em- 
ployes shall be selected, and all other questions, except as here- 
inafter prescribed, shall be decided by the entire Board, a majority 
of the delegates of the parties of the first part concurring in such 
selection and decision. A quorum for the transaction of business 
shall be constituted by the presence of a majority of the delegates 
of the party of the first part. 

3. The Board may adopt rules and regulations prescribing the 
duties of each and all of its officers, its method of procedure and 
the general transaction of its business. 

4. It shall be the duty of the Board, and it shall have full and 
final jurisdiction: 

(a) To hear and determine all disputes and complaints between 
associations and clubs; between one club and another, members 
of different associations; between clubs and players or managers, 
and, in addition thereto, all disputes and complaints arising under 
jind «f all matters involving the interpretation of the National 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 21 

Agreement or the disposition of the rights thereunder. Clubs 
belonging to the same association, by mutual consent, or upon 
the request of the association to which they belong, may refer any 
controversy between such clubs or in which such clubs are 
interested, to the Board for decision or adjustment. 

(A) In the performance of its duties the Board shall have power 
to impose fines or penalties upon associations, clubs, club officers, 
players, managers, scorers and umpires, and to suspend any such 
organization or person from the protection and privileges of the 
National Agreement in any instances in which, in its opinion, it 
or he shall have been guilty of conduct detrimental to the general 
welfare of the game, or in violation of the letter or spirit of the 
National Agreement. 

(c) Its decisions shall be final over any and all matters within 
its jurisdiction. 

(d) It may reinstate any person or body suspended. 

(e) It shall have power to make such reasonable assessments 
upon clubs or associations as may be necessary to defray the ex- 
penses incidental to the performance of its duties and the enforce- 
ment of this Agreement. 

(/) It may make all orders, rules and regulations, which it may 
deem necessary for the performance of its duties and the exercise 
of its powers, and to accomplish the purpose in view in its estab- 
lishment, and r.mend and supplement the same from time to time; 
provided, prior notice of any proposed amendments or supple- 
ments be given to all members of the Board before action be taken 
thereon. 

(g) It may cause the proceedings or rulings, or any part thereof, 
in any case which may be deemed of sufficient importance to serve 
as a precedent, to be published in such a manner as may be 
prescribed. 

(h) Whenever anybody or person shall desire to submit any 
matter for the consideration of the Board it shall be presented to 
the chairman by a concise statement thereof, and accompanied by 
such evidence as may be in support of such statement. Notice 
shall be given to any other body or person interested in the matter, 
to make answer and to present appropriate evidence in support 
thereof. 

5. (a) Associations parties of the second part shall be known 
and designated as members of Class A, and associations parties of 
the third part shall be known and designated as members of Class 
B, and an association of either class whose membership shall at 
any time be reduced to less than four clubs actually engaged in a 
schedule of championship games during and to the close of the 
season shall cease to be parties to, and forfeit all rights, privileges 
and protection under the National Agreement. 



22 NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

(i) Whentan association applies for protection and classification 
under the National Agreement, it shall include and state in its 
application to the secretary of the Board: The class, A or B, into 
which it seeks admission; the list of its club members with the re- 
spective location of their business offices and playing grounds; 
the monthly salary limit for its club teams and maximum monthly 
salary lintft of their players; a copy of the constitution and by- 
laws of the association; a pledge or agreement for the maintenance 
of said salary limit and the faithful performance of its obligations 
under the National Agreement, its own constitution and by-laws, 
and its other contractual obligations; which classification, club 
membership, location of club offices and playing grounds, salary 
limit, constitution, by-laws and pledge or agreement shall not, 
after approval by the Board, be changed, modified, altered or 
released without the assent of the Board. 

(c) Class A shall constitute associations whose clubs shall have 
the privilege of contracting with their players for one, two or three 
seasons or years, and of reservation, in accordance with Art. 9, 
of players under contract of only one season or year; subject to 
the right of "selection" of their players by a club member of the 
party of the first part, in accordance With Art. 6, at the rate of 
$1000 for the release of each player so "selected." When such 
association shall consist of but four clubs, it shall pay to the sec- 
retary of the Board $250 for each of said clubs; when of six clubs, 
$200 for each of said clubs; when of eight or more clubs, $150 
for each of said clubs. Such payments to be made before the 
beginning of the championship season. 

(d) Class B shall constitute associations whose clubs shall have 
the privilege of contracting with their players for but one season 
with or without reservation (in accordance with Art. 9) as they 
may elect by notice to the secretary of the Board prior to the 
beginning of their championship season. Such association shall 
be subject to the right of "selection" by a club member of either 
of the parties of the first and second part in accordance with Art. 
6, at the rate of $500 for the release of each player so "selected" 
— if entitled to reservation privileges. 

When such association shall elect reservation privileges, it shall 
pay to the secretary of the Board for each of its clubs one-half the 
sums payable, as above prescribed, for associations in Class A, 
and, when not entitled to reservation privileges, the sum of 
twenty-five dollars per club prior to the beginning of the playing 
season. 

6. (a) For the purpose of enabling players to advance in their 
profession a club member of the party of the first part may, at 
any time after October I, in any year and before February 1 of the 
succeeding year, with the consent of the Board, negotiate with any 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



23 



player then under contract with or reservation by a club member 
of such association, and "select" such player upon payment of 
the sum specified in Art. 5. And a club member of an association 
in Class A may negotiate with and make similar "selection" of a 
player then under contract and reservation by a club member of 
an association in Class B. Provided, that no such "selection" 
shall be enforced, and no transfer of a player shall be made unless 
he shall receive an increase of salary. 

(/») Any club entitled to make a "selection" of a player and 
desiring to do so, shall notify the secretary of the Board, stating 
the name of the player and the club with which he is under con- 
tract of reservation, and inclosing the amount specified in Art. 5, 
to be paid for such release. The secretary shall thereupon notify 
the club or association from which such "selection" is to be made, 
and shall order his transfer to the "selecting" club. Notice of 
such transfer shall thereupon be promulgated. 

7. Contracts between clubs and players shall be in writing in 
the form prescribed by the Board. An informal contract, whether 
evidenced by telegrams or other writing, shall be valid for a period 
not exceeding thirty days, until a contract in the prescribed form 
shall be tendered by the contracting club to the contracting player. 
The failure of the club to so tender such formal contract will 
release the player from all contractual obligations thereunder, and 
the refusal of the player to execute such formal contract when so 
tendered shall extend the validity of his informal contract until he 
shall execute said formal contract. 

S. No club shall at any time enter into negotiations or contract 
with any player under contract to or reservation by another club 
without the latter's consent, under such fines and penalties as the 
Board may inflict. 

9. On or before the tenth day of October in each year the 
secretaries of associations, parties hereto, entitled to privilege of 
reservation, shall transmit to the secretary of the Board a reserve 
list of players, not exceeding fourteen in number, then under con- 
tract with each of its several club members, for the current or for 
any succeeding season or seasons, and in addition thereto a list of 
such players reserved in any prior annual reserve list, who have 
refused to contract with such clubs, and of all ineligible players. 
Such players, together with all others thereafter to be regularly 
contracted with by such clubs, are and shall be ineligible to con- 
tract with any other club of any association, except as herein pre- 
scribed. The secretary of said Board shall thereupon promulgate 
such lists, provided that no club shall be permitted to reserve any 
player while in arrears of salary to him. 

10. The Board may also release from contract or reservation 
any player or manager, when the club with which he has con- 



2 4 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



traded, or by which ne has oeen reserved, shall be in arrears to 
him for salary for more than fifteen days after such salary became 
due; or when the reserving club has failed to tender to any player, 
on or before the 1st day of March, after such reservation, a formal 
contract, with a salary of at least such an amount per month as 
the Board may fix as the minimum salary to be paid to such player, 
or when any such reserving club has transferred its membership 
after the close of a championship season to a different association, 
if the Board shall deem that the player will be prejudiced by such 
transfer. 

11. When a player under contract or reservation by any club 
of an association party hereto shall be expelled, suspended or 
rendered ineligible, in accordance with the rules of such associa- 
tion, notice of such disqualification shall be given to the said 
Board by the secretary of the association fiom whose club the 
player may have been thus disqualified, and the Board shall forth- 
with give notice of such disqualification to the several clubs acting 
under this Agreement. When a player shall become ineligible 
under the provision: of this Agreement, or by order of the Board, 
the secretary of the Board shall notify the several clubs acting 
under this agreement of such disqualification. From the receipt 
of any such notice all club members of associations acting under 
this Agreement shall be debarred from employing or playing with 
or against such disqualified player until the period of disqualifica- 
tion shall have terminated or the disqualification be revoked by 
the association from which such player was disqualified, or by the 
Board, and due notice of such revocation shall be given by the 
Board to the said several clubs. 

12. Any player, who has entered into a contract with any club 
of an association party hereto, may be suspended without pay or 
fined by such club or association for breach of contract or breach 
of any of the rules of such club or association, and he shall there- 
after be ineligible to sign or play during the remainder of the 
current season with any of the clubs of any association acting 
hereunder, unless such disability shall have been sooner removed 
by the club or association by which he was suspended, or by the 
Board. 

13. Upon the release of a player from contract or reservation 
with any club member of an association then acting under this 
Agreement (unless the release be made by " selection " under 
Art. 6), the services of such player shall at once be subject to 
acceptance by any club belonging to the same association, ex- 
pressed in writing or by telegraph to the Secretary of the Board, 
for a period of ten days after notice of said release ; anil there- 
after if said services be not so accepted, said player may nego- 
tiate and contract with any club. The releasing club shall send 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



25 



notice to the Secretary of the Hoard of said player's release on 
the date thereof, and the latter shall promulgate any acceptance 
of his services. Provided, that the disbandment of a club or 
its expulsion from membership in either association acting 
hereunder shall operate as a release of all of its players from 
contract with or reservation by said club. But the services of 
such players shall at once be subject to the acceptance of such 
association for a period of ten days, for the purpose of supply- 
ing the vacancy in its membership. 

14. Each association shall have the right to make and enforce 
all rules and regulations pertaining to the control, discipline 
and compensation of all players under contract with its club 
members. And it may prescribe that all contracts with its 
players shall be made directly with said association, assignable 
to its club members, with the right of reservation to be exclu- 
sively exercised by said association, in which event all the pro- 
visions of this agreement applying to contacts or reservation of 
players with and by club members shall apply to such con- 
tracts and reservation of players with and by said association. 
Provided, that such rules and regulations shall in no way con- 
flict with the provisions of this Agreement, or any rule, regula- 
tion or order of the Board. 

15. Each club of the association party of the first part shall 
have exclusive control of its own territory, and no club shall 
be entitled to membership in either of said associations, parties 
of second or third parts from any city or county in which a 
club member of the party of the first part may be already 
located, or within five miles from any such city or county with- 
out the consent of such club member, party of first part. No 
club shall play a game within the city in which any other club 
member of an association party hereto is located without the 
consent of such other club. 

16. No game shall be played between any club of any associ- 
ation acting hereunder, or any of its players under contract or 
reservation, with any other club or "team" containing an in- 
eligible player ; nor with a club or team that has played with 
another club or team containing such ineligible player. A 
violation of this section shall subject each offender to fine, sus- 
pension or expulsion, in the discretion of the Board. 

17. Should a club of any association agree in writing or by 
telegraph with another club of an association, subject to the 
National Agreement, for the release of any player then under 
contract or reservation with or by it, either party may file said 
agreement with the Board, and should any such club refuse to 
comply with its said agreement the Board may require said 
agreement to be complied with, and may transfer the said 



26 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



player accordingly, and may expel or otherwise punish the chili 
so refusing to comply vvilli its said agreement. 

18. Before any association shall be granted the privileges 
and protection of this Agreement it shall enact laws or regula- 
tions debarring any of its clubs from entering into contract with 
any player while under arrears of salary to him, and from sus- 
pending or otherwise attempting to disqualify such player for 
refusing to contract while it is so in arrears, and shall also pro- 
vide for the expulsion of any club for refusal to pay arrears of 
salary to a player when thereto required by said association or 
by the Board. 

19. All rights of any association hereunder shall be forfeited 
for failing to expel any of its club members that may play a 
game of ball except under the Playing Rules adopted by the 
National League and American Association of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs. 

20. The term "association," as herein used, shall mean and 
comprise an organization of professional or semi-professional 
base ball clubs of not less than four clubs, whether known as a 
" league," "association," or by any other designation. 

21. This agreement may be altered or amended at any time, 
upon suggestion of the Board, by the party of the first part. It 
shall take effect and be in force from and after March 2, 1892. 

I hereby certify that the Association party hereto has 
adopted, ratified and approved this Agreement and authorized 
its President to sign the same. 

N. E. YOUNG, 

President National League ami American 

Association of Professional Base Jiall Chilis. 



RULES ash REGULATIONS. 



27 



The Rules and Regulations of the National Board 
of Professional Base Ball Associations. 

The following rules and regulations have been adopted by 
the National Board of Professional Base Hall Associations, and 
are here given in order that they may be understood by all 
those interested. The same being adopted and to remain in 
force until repealed, altered, added to or amended. 

THE CHAIRMAN. 

1. The duties of the Chairman shall be as follows: 

((/) To issue calls for meetings of the Hoard and preside at 
such meetings ; having all powers with reference thereto which 
are incident to a presiding officer. 

lb) To rule upon and decide all incidental and routine 
matters presented for determination, with power to delegate 
this duty to the Secretary or any member of the Board, 

(<) To supervise the performance of the duties imposed upon 
the other members of the Board. 

(d) To see that each and all of the orders of this Board are 
complied with. 

THE SECRETARY AND TREASURER. 

2. The offices of the Secretary and Treasurer may be filled 
by one and the same person, and the duties of such officer shall 
be as follows : 

(a) To receive, receipt for and disburse all moneys payable to 
this Board, and to make all financial statements required by the 
provisions of the National Agreement. 

(I>) To keep the records of the proceedings of the Board, 
together with all the records required to be kept by the provi- 
sions of the National Agreement. 

(<■) To issue all notices required by the National Agreement 
to be issued. 

(./) To give interpretation to the playing rules when requested 
so to do, pursuant to the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(e) To receive ali applications for membership under the 
National Agreement and to see that the applicants pay their 
proper dues. 

(f) To give notice of all fines and penalties imposed by the 
Board and to see that the same are paid. 

(g) To attend to such other matters as may be required of 
him by the Board, and to keep records of all the business and 
duties connected with the Board. 



28 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



ELECTIONS. 

The Chairman and the Secretary and Treasurer shall be 
elected annually at some meeting after the first of January, and 
shall hold until their successors are elected and qualify. 
OPINIONS AND DECISIONS. 

Whenever any controversy or matter to be submitted to the 
Hoard for adjustment or decision shall be forwarded, together 
with all evidence and documents therewith connected, to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, he shall, after submitting the same to 
the Hoard, promulgate or publish the opinion, which must be 
prepared by the Chairman or such other member of the Board 
as he shall designate. 

SELECTION OF PLAYERS. 

Whenever any player shall lie "selected " by more than one 
club, the Board will award him to the club which shall have 
first filed formal notice with the Secretary that it desires the 
services of said player. Such notice, however, must be accom- 
panied by the deposit required by the provisions of the National 
Agreement, otherwise such notice will be of no effect and void. 
A player so awarded shall be ineligible to sign with any other 
club, and upon declining to abide by the decisions of the Board, 
maybe included in the regular list of reserved players of the 
club selecting him as per the provisions of Section 9 of the Na- 
tional Agreement. 

ACCEPTED PLAYERS. 

Whenever the services of any player released under the pro- 
visions of the National Agreement are accepted by any club or 
association, authorized so to do by the provisions of such agree- 
ment, notice thereof shall be at once given to the Secretary, 
who shall accordingly promulgate the fact. 

PAYMENTS. 

All expenses of the Board, including compensation to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, or to any other officer or member of 
the Board for special work performed, telegraphing, postage, 
and such other expenses as shall be allowed, must be paid by 
check of the Secretary and Treasurer and vouchers taken 
thereof, which vouchers shall be submitted at least once a year 
to the Board for examination and approval. 



THE NATIONAL BOARD 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



1895. 



OFFICE, WASHINGTON, I). C. 



M EMBERS OF THE BOARD : 

N. E. Young, - - Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Box 536, Washington, D. C. 
Chas. II. BYRNE, .... - Brooklyn, N.Y. 
A. H. Soden, ...... Boston, Mass. 



the; playing rules 



PROFESSIONAL 
BASK * BALL * CLUBS 



As adopted by the Natlor^al League «r\cl Ameri- 
can Association of Profeasioria] Baee 
Ball Clubs. 

THE BALI. GROUND. 

Rule i. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient 
in size to enable each player to play in his position as required 
by these Rules. 

Rule 2. To lay off the lines governing the positions and 
play off the Game known as Base Ball, proceed as follows : 

From a point, A, within the grounds, project a right line out 
into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point A, lay off 
lines B C and BD at right angles to the line A B ; then with B 
as centre and 63.63945 feet as radius, describe arcs cutting the 
lines B A at F and B C at G ; BDatll; and B E at I. Draw 
lines F G, G E, E II and II F, and said lines will be the con- 
taining lines of the Diamond or Infield. 

THE CATCHER'S LINES. 

Rule 3. With F as centre and 90 feet radius, an arc cut- 
ting line F A at L, and draw lines L M and L O at right angles 
to F A ; and continue same out from F A not less than 90 feet. 
THE FOUL LINE. 
Rule 4. From the intersection point, F, continue the straight 
lines F G and F H until they intersect with the lines L M and 
L I, and then from the points G and II in the opposite direc- 
tion until they reach the boundary lines of the grounds. 
THE PLAYERS' LINES. 

Rule 5. With F as centre and 50 feet radius, describe arcs 
cutting lines F O and E M at P and Q, then with F as centre 
again and 75 feet radius describe arcs cutting F G and F 11 at 
R and S ; then from the points P Q R and S draw lines at 
right angles to the lines F O, F M, F G, and F II, and con- 
tinue same until they intersect at the points T W and \Y. 



PLAYING RULES. 



31 



THE CAPTAIN AND COACHERS' LINE. 
RULE 6. With R and S as centres and 15 feet radius, de- 
scribe arcs cutting lines R W and S T at X and Y, and from 
the points X and Y draw lines parallel with lines F II and KG, 
and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground. 

Till! THREE FOOT LINE. 

RULE 7. With F as centre and 45 feet radius, describe an 
arc cutting line !•' G at I, and from 1 out to the distance of 3 
feet draw a line at right angles to F G, and marked point 2 ; 
then from point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a 
point 3 feet beyond the point G, and marked 3 ; then from the 
point 3 draw a fine at right angles to line 2, 3, back to and in- 
tersecting with line F G, and irom thence back along line G F 
to point I. 

the pitcher's plate. 

Rule 8. With point F as centre and 60.5 feet as radius, 
describe an arc cutting the line F B at a point 4, ■ nd draw a 
line 5, 6, passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on 
either side of line F B ; then with lines. 6. as a side, describe 
a parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches. 

THE BASES. 

Rule 9. Within the angle F, describe a square the sides 
of which shall be 12 inches, two of its sides lying upon the 
lines F G and F H, and within the angles G and H describe 
squares the side of which shall be 15 inches, the two outer 
sides of said square lying upon the lines F G and G I and F H 
and H I, and at the angle E describe a square whose side shall 
be 15 inches and so described that its sides shall be parallel 
with G I and I H and its centre immediately over the angular 
point E. 

THE BATSMAN'S LINE. 

Rule 10. On either side of the line A F B describe two 
parallelograms 6 feet long and 4 feet wide (marked 8 and 9), 
their length being parallel with the line A 1" B, their distance 
apart being 6 inches, added to each end of the length of the 
diagonal of the square within the angle F, ami the centre of 
their length being upon said diagonal. 

Rule II. The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's Plate at 
4 must be of whitened rubber and so fixed in the ground as to 
be even with the surface. 

RULE 12. The First Base at G, the Second Base at E. and 
the Third Base at H, must be of white canvas bags, filled with 
soft material, and securely fastened in their positions described 
in Rule 9. 



32 



PLAYING Kl lis. 



Rule 13. The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 1 
must be marked with lime, chalk, or other suitable material, 
so as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire. 

THE BALL. 

Rule 14. The Ball.* (See Foot Note.) 

Section i. Must not weigh less than five nor more than five 
and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than 
nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in circumfer- 
ence. The Spalding League Ball, or the Reach American 
Association Ball, must be used in all games played under these 
rules. 

Sec. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be 
furnished by the Home Club to the Umpire for use. When 
the ball in play is batted to foul ground, out of sight 'of the 
Umpire, the other ball shall be immediately brought into play. 
As often as one of the two in use shall be lost a new one must 
be substituted, so that the Umpire shall at all times after the 
game begins have two balls for use. The moment the Umpire 
delivers an alternate ball to the pitcher it comes into play, and 
shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, passes out of sight to 
foul ground. 

Sec. 3. In all games the ball or balls played with shall be 
furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes 
the property of the winning club. Each ball to be used in 
championship games shall be examined, measured and weighed 
by the Secretary of the Association, inclosed in a paper box 
and sealed with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not 
be broken except by the Umpirt ; n the presence ot the Captains 
of the two contesting nines aftft: ilay has been called. 

Sec. 4. Should the ball bet. me out of shape, or cut or 
ripped so as to expose the interior, or in any way so injured as 
to be, in the opinion of the Umpire, unfit for fair use, he shall, 
upon appeal by either Captain, at once put the alternate ball 
into play and call for a new one. 

THE BAT. 

Rule 15. The Bat: 

Must be made entirely of hard wood, except that the handlt 
may be wound with twine, or a granulated substance appUcd, 
not to exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

•The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the past eighteen years, and is used in all League contests. 

For junior dabs (clubs composed of boys under 1H years of age) we 
recommend them to use liie Spalding^ Boys 1 League Ball and that games 
played by junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same as 
)f played with the Official League Ball. 



PLAYING RULES. 33 

It must be round, not exceed two and three-quarter inches 
in diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two 
inches in length. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Rule 16. The players of each club in a game shall be nine 
in number, one of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case 
shall less than nine men be allowed to play on each side. 

Rule 17. The players' positions shall be such as may be 
assigned them by their Captain, except that the pitcher must 
take the position as defined in Rules 8 and 29. 

Rule 18. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to 
occupy seats among the spectators. 

Rule 19. Section i. Every club shall adopt uniforms for its 
players, but no player shall attach anything to the sole or heel 
of his shoes other than the ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

Sec. 2. The catcher and first baseman are permitted to wear 
a glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight. All other players 
are restricted to the use of a glove v >r mitt weighing not over ten 
ounces, and measuring in circumfei nee around the palm of the 
hand not over fourteen inches. 

PLAYERS' BENCHES. 

RULE 20. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the 
Home Club, and placed upon a portion of the ground outside 
of, and not nearer than twenty- five feet to, the players' lines. 
One such bench must be for the exclusive use of the visiting 
club, and one for the exclusive use of the home club, and the 
players of the competing teams shall be required to occupy 
their respective benches while not engaged in active play. 
THE GAME. 

Rule 21. Section i. Every Championship game must be 
commenced not later than two hours before sunset. 

Sec. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that 

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings 
than the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall 
then terminate. 

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings scores the 
winning run before the third man is out, the game shall ter- 

m ' nate - A TIE GAME. 

Rule 22. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings, 
play shall be continued until one side has scored more runs 
than the other in an equal number of innings, provided that if 
the side last at bat scores the winning run before the third man 
is out the game shall terminate. 



r 



34 



PLAYING RULES. 



A DRAWN GAME. 

Rum; 23. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire 
when he terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, 
after five equal innings have been played, if the score at the 
time is equal on the last even innings played; but (exception) 
if the side that went second to bat is then at the bat, and has 
scored the same number of runs as the other side, the Umpire 
shall declare the game drawn without regard to the score of 
the last equal innings. 

A CALLED GAME. 

Rule 24. If the Umpire calls •• Game " on account of dark- 
ness or rain at any time after five innings have been completed, 
the score shall be that of the last equal innings played, unless 
the side second at bat shall have scored one or more runs than 
the side first at bat, in which case the score of the game shall 
be the total number of runs made. 

A FORFEITED GAME. 

Rule 25. A forfeited game shall be declared by the Umpire 
in favor of the club not in fault, at the request of such club, in 
the following cases : 

Section i. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon a field, 
or being upon the field, fail to begin the game within five min- 
utes after the Umpire has called " Play," at the hour appointed 
for the beginning of the game, unless such delay in appearing 
or in commencing the game be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or 
fails to continue playing, unless such game has been suspended 
or terminated by the Umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing within one minute after the 
Umpire has called '-Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team resorts to dilatory practice to delay the 
game. 

Sec. 5. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these 
rules is wilfully violated. 

Sec. 6. If, after ordering the removal of a player as author- 
ized by Rule 59, Sec. 5. said order is not obeyed within one 
minute. 

Sec. 7. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he 
shall transmit a written notice thereof to the President »f the 
Association within twenty-four hours thereafter. 
NO game. 

Rule 26. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if 
he shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness, before 
five innings on each side are completed, except in a case when 



PLAYING HI 



3? 



the game is called, and the club second at bat shall have 
more runs at the end of its fourth innings than the club first at 
bat has made in its five innings, then the Umpire shall award 
the game to the club having made the greatest number of runs, 
and it shall be a game and be so counted in the Championship 
record. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

Rule 27. Section I. In every championship game each 
team shall be required to have present on the field, in uniform, 
one or more substitute players. 

SEC. 2. Any such player may be substituted at any time by 
either club, but no player thereby retired shall thereafter par- 
ticipate in the game. 

Sec. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run for 
him except by consent of the Captains o( the contesting teams. 
CHOICE OF INNINGS — CONDITION OF GROUND. 

RULE 28. The choice of innings shall be given to the Cap- 
tain of the Home Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the 
fitness of the ground for beginning a game after rain. 
THE PITCHER'S POSITION. 

Rule 29. The Pitcher shall shall take his position facing 
the Batsman with both feet square on the ground, and in front 
of the Pitcher's plate, but in the act of delivering the ball one 
foot must be in contact with the pitcher's plate, defined in 
Rule 8. He shall not raise either foot, unless in the act of 
delivering the ball, nor make more than one step in such 
delivery. He shall hold the ball, before the delivery, fairly in 
front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire. When the 
Pitcher ieigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the 
above position and pause momentarily before delivering the 
ball to the bat. 

THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL — FAIR AND UNFAIR BALLS. 

Rule 30. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher 
while standing in his position, and facing the Batsman, the 
ball so delivered to pass over the Home Base, not lower than 
the Batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 

Rule 31, An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 30, except that the ball does not pass over the Home 
Base, or does pass over the Home Base above the Batsman's 
shoulder or below the knur. 

11 A I. KING. 

Rule 32 A Balk shall be : 

Section I. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the 
ball to the bat without delivering it. 



f 



36 



li 1 1 ING RULES. 



SEC. 2. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to 
delay the game unnecessarily. 

Sec. 3. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by the 
Pitcher while not in the position defined in Rule 29. 

DEAD BALLS. 

Rule 33. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher that touches any part of the Batsman's person or cloth- 
ing while standing in his position without being struck at ; or 
any part of the Umpire's person or clothing, while on foul 
ground, without first passing the Catcher. 

Rule 34. In case of a Foul Strike, P'oul Hit ball not legally 
caught out. Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck 
by a fair hit ball, the ball shall not be considered in play until 
it is held by the Pitcher standing in his position, and the 
Umpire shall have called play. 

BLOCK BALLS. 

RULE 35. Section i. A Block is a batted or thrown ball 
that is touched, stopped or handled by any person not engaged 
in the game. 

SEC. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare 
it, and Base Runners may run the bases without being put out 
until the ball has been returned to and held by the pitcher 
standing in his position. 

Sec. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick 
it beyond the reach of the Fielders, the Umpire should call 
•• Time." and require each Base Runner to stop at the last base 
touched by him until the ball I e returned to the pitcher stand- 
ing in his position, and the Umpire shall have called play. 

THE BATSMAN'S POSITION — ORDER OF BATTING. 

Rule 36. The Batsmen must take their positions within the 
Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule 10, in the order in which 
they are named in the batting order, which batting order must 
he submitted by the Captains of the opposing teams to the Um- 
pire before the game, and this batting order must be followed 
except in the case of a substitute player, in which case the 
substitute must lake the place of the original player in the 
baiting order. After the first inning the first striker in each 
inning shall he the batsman whose name follows that of the 
last man who has completed his turn — time at bat — in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

RULE 37. Section i. When their side goes to the bat the 

is must immediately return to the players' bench, as de- 

Imed in Rule 20, and remain there until the side is put out, ex- 



PLAYING Rt71.ES. 



37 



cept when batsmen or base runners ; provided, that the Captain 
and one assistant only may occupy the space between the Play- 
ers' Lines and the Captain's Lines, to coach base runners. 

SEC. 2. Noplaye of the side "at bat," except when batsman, 
shall occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's 
Lines, as defined in Rule 3. The triangular space behind the 
Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of Umpire, 
Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any 
player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any 
time while the ball is in the hands of, or passing between the 
Pitcher and Catcher, while standing in their positions. 

Sec. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the 
portion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any 
portion thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or any 
Fielder attempting to catch or field it. 

THE BATTING RULES. 

Rule 38. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches any part of the person of a 
player or umpire or falls within the foul lines, that (whether it 
first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls within the 
Foul Lines, between Home and First, or Home and Third 
Bases, without interference by a player. 

Rule 39. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, 
standing in his position, that first touches the ground, any part 
of the person of a player, or any object behind either of the 
Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, while 
standing in his position, or batted by the Batsman, standing in 
his position, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls outside the Foul Lines, between Home and 
First or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a 
player: Provided, that a Foul Hit ball not rising above the 
Batsman's head, and caught by the Catcher playing within ten 
feet of the Home Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip. 

Rule 40. A bunt hit is a deliberate attempt on the part of 
the Batsman to hit a ball slowly within the infield so that it 
cannot be fielded by any infielder in time to retire the batsman. 
BALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS. 

Rule 41. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, 
the Umpire shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, or 
Foul should it disappear outside of, the range of the Foul 
Lines, and Rules 38 and 39 are to be construed accordingly. 

RULE 42. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence shall 
entitle the batsman to a home run, except that should it go 
over the fenoe at a less distance than two hundred and thirty- 
five feet from the Home Base, when he shall be entitled to two 



38 



PLAYING RULES. 



bases only, an<l :i (distinctive line shall be marked on the fence 

at llHS P 0int STRIKES. 

RULE 43. A strike is : 

SECTION I. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its 
touching his bat ; or 

Sec. 2. A Pair Ball legally delivered by the Pitcher, but 
not struck at by the Batsman. 

Sec. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a Foul Hit. 

Sec. 4. A Foul Hit, other than a Foul Tip, made by the Bats- 
man while attempting a bunt hit, as defined in Rule 40, thai 
falls or rolls upon foul ground between Home Base and First 
Base or Home Base and Third Base. 

Sec. 5. A ball struck at, if the ball touches any part of the 
Batsman's person. 

Sec. 6. A ball tipped by the Batsman and caught by the 
catcher within the 10-foot lines. 

Rule 44. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman 
when any part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of 
the Batsman's position. 

THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

Rule 45. The Batsman is out : 

Section I. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his 
order of batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper 
Batsman takes his position before a time "at bat" re- 
corded ; and in such case the balls and strikes called must be 
counted in the time " at bat " of the proper Batsman, and only 
the proper Batsman shall be declared out : Provided, this rule 
shall not take effect unless the out is declared before the ball is 
delivered to the succeeding Batsman, and no runs shall be 
scored or bases run, and further, no outs shall be counted other 
than that of the proper Batsman. 

Sec. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute 
after the Umpire has called for the Batsman. 

Sec. 3. If he makes a P'oul Hit other than a Foul Tip, as 
defined in Rule 39, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be not caught 
in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a 
Fielder, before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he makes a Foul Strike. 

Sec. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of his posi- 
tion, or otherwise obstructing or interfering with the player. 

Sec. 6. If, while the First Base be occupied by a base 
runner, three strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except 
when two men are already out. 



5Z.'rc.-4tac<«.aai3S« 



PLAYING RULES. 



39 



Sec. 7. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman 
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Rule 43, Section 3. 

Sec. 8. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touches 
any part of the Batsman's person, in which case base runners 
occupying bases shall return, as prescribed in Rule 49, Section 5. 

Sec. 9. If he hits a fly ball that can be handled by an in- 
fielder while first and second bases are occupied, or first, second 
and third, with on'y one out. 

Sec. 10. If the third strike is called in accordance with 
Section 4, Rule 43, in such case the Umpire shall, as soon as 
the ball is hit, declare infield or outfield hit. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 

WHEN THE BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER. 

Rule 46. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner : 

Section i. Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

Sec. 2. Instantly after four balls have been called by the 
Umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been decided by 
the Umpire. 

Sec. 4. I while he be a Batsman, without making any 
attempt to s .rike, his person — excepting hands or forearm, 
which makes t a dead ball — or clothing be hit by a ball from 
the Pitcher ; nless, in the opinion of the Umpire, he intention- 
ally permits himself to be so hit. 

Sec. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the 
Pitcher. bases to be touched. 

Rule 47. The Base Runner must touch each base in regular 
order, viz., First, Second, Third and Home Bases, and when 
obliged to return (except on a foul hit) must retouch the base 
or bases in reverse order. He shall only be considered as 
holding a base after touching it, and shall then be entitled to 
hold such base until he has legally touched the next base in 
order, or has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding 
Base Runner. 

ENTITLED TO BASIS. 

Rule 48. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being 
put out, to take the base in the following cases: 

Section i. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called 
four balls. 

Sec. 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding batsman a base 
on four balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of 
an illegal delivery — as in Rule 46, Section 5 — and the Base 
Runner is thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 

Sec. 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk." 



4° 



PLAYINf, RULES. 



Sf.c. 4. If a ball, delivered by the Pitcher, pass the Catcher 
and touch the Umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the Home liase. 

SEC. 5. If, upon a fair hit, the ball strikes the person or 
clothing of the Umpire on fair ground. 

Sec. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of an adversary, 

Sec. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his 
hat or any part of his dress. 

RETURNING TO BASES. 

Rule 49. The Base Runner shall return to his base, and 
shall be entitled to so return without being put out: 

Skction 1. If the Umpire declares a Foul Tip (as defined 
in Rule 39), or any other Foul Hit not legally caught by a fielder. 

Sec. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 
Sec. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also 
the fourth Unfair Ball and he be thereby forced to take the 
next base, as provided in Rule 48, Section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire interferes 
with the Catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the Catcher 
to intercept a Base Runner. 

Sec. 5. The Base Runner shall return to his base, if, while 
attempting a strike, the ball touches any part of the Batsman's 
person. when base runners are out. 

Rule 50. The Base Runner is out: 

Section i. If, after three strikes have been declared against 
him while Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third 
strike ball, he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from 
fielding the ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair 
hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the 
ground, or any object other than a Fielder : Provided, it be not 
caught in a Fielder's hat or cap. 

Sec. 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on 
him, while Batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held 
by a Fielder before touching the ground : Provided, it be not 
caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other 
than a Fielder, before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a Fielder before he shall have 
touched First Bate. 

Sec. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, tne ball be 
securely held by a Fielder, while touching First Base with any 
part of his person, before such Base Runner touches First Base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
Home Base to First Base, while the ball is being fielded to First 



■P 



PLAYING RULES. 41 

Base, he runs outside the three-foot lines, as defined in H.uie 7, 
unless to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a Batted Ball. 

SEC. 7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from 
Second to Third Base, or from Third to Home Base, he runs 
more than three feet from a direct line between such bases, to 
avoid being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder ; 
but in case a Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's proper 
path, in attempting to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner 
shall run out of the path, and behind said Fielder, and shall 
not be declared out for so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 of 
this Rule ; or if he in any way obstructs a Fielder attempting 
to field a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown 
ball : Provided, that if two or more Fielders attempt to field 
a batted ball, and the Base Runner comes in contact with one 
or more of them, the Umpire shall determine which P'ielder 
is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and shall not decide the 
Base Runner out for coming in contact with any other fielder. 

Sec. 9. If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, unless some part 
of his person is touching a base he is entitled to occupy : Pro- 
vided, the ball be held by the Fielder after touching him ; but 
(exception as to First Base), in running to First Base he may 
overrun said base, without being put out forbeingofT said base, 
after first touching it, provided he returns at once and retouches 
the base, after which he may be put out as at any other base. 
If, in overruning First Base, he also attempts to run to Second 
Base, or, after passing the base he turns to his left from the 
foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out. 

SEC. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as referred to in Rule 39) is legally caught by a Fielder, 
such ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base occupied by 
the Base Runner when such ball was struck (or the Base Run- 
ner be touched with the ball in the hands of a Fielder), before 
he retouches said base after such Fair or Foul Hit ball was so 
caught : Provided, that the Base Runner shall not be out in 
such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it be 
delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it 
on said base, or touches the Base Runner with it ; but if the 
Base Runner in attempting to reach a base, detaches it before 
being touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sec. 11. If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, the 
First Base, or the First and Second Bases, or the First, Second 
and Third Bases, be occupied, any Base Runner so occupying 
a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until any following 
Base Runner is put out, and may be put out at the next base or 



4* 



M.AYINC RULES. 



by being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder in the 
same manner as in running to First Base, at any time before 
any following Base Runner is put out. 

Sec. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him before touching the 
Fielder, and in such case no base shall be run unless forced by 
the Batsman becoming a base runner, and no run shall be 
scored ; or any other Base Runner put out. 

Sec. 13. If, when running to a base or forced to return to a 
base, he fail to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in 
the order prescribed in Rule 47, he may be put out at the base 
he fails to touch, or being touched by the ball in the hands 
of a Fielder, in the same manner as in running to First Base : 
Provided, that the Base Runner shall not be out in such case if 
the ball be delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the 
Fielder holds it on said base or touches the Base Runner with it. 

Sec. 14. If, when the Umpire calls " Play," after any sus- 
pension of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he 
occupied when " Time " was called before touching the next 
base : Provided, the Base Runner shall not be out in such case 
if the ball be delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the 
Fielder holds it on said base or touches the Base Runner with it. 
WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER IS OUT. 

RULE 51. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base 

Runner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, 

in all cases where such player is put out in accordance with 

these rules, except as provided in Rule 50, Sections 10 and 14. 

COACHING RULES. 

RULE 52. The coachers shall be restricted to coaching the 
Base Runner only, and shall not be allowed to address any 
remarks except to the Base Runner, and then only in words of 
necessary direction ; and shall not use language which will in 
any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing 
club, the Umpire or the spectators, and not more than two 
coachers, who may be one player participating in the game and 
any other player under contract to it, in the uniform of either 
club, shall be allowed at any one time. To enforce the above, 
the Captain of the opposite side may call the attention of the 
Umpire to the offence, and upon a repetition of the same, the 
offending player shall be debarred from further participation in 
the game and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 
"1 III". SCORING OF RUNS. 

Rule 53. One run shall be scored every time a Base Run- 
ner, after having legally touched the first three bases, shall 
touch the Home Base before three men are put out by 
(exception). If the third man is forced out, or is put out be- 
fore reaching First Base, a run ihall not be scored. 



M.AYINO RULES. 



43 



THE UMPIRE. 

Ri i.k 54. The Umpire shall not be changed during the 
progress of a game, except for reason of illness or injury. 
Ills POWERS AND JURISDICTION. 

Rule 55. Section 1. The Umpire is master of the Field 
from the commencement to the termination of the game, and is 
entitled to the respect of the spectators, and any person offer- 
ing any insult or indignity to him must be promptly ejected 
from the grounds. 

SEC. 2. He must be invariably addressed by the players as 
Mr. Umpire; and he must compel the players to observe the 
provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested 
with authority to order any player to do or omit to do any act 
as he may deem necessary, to give force and effect to any and 
all such provisions. 

SPECIAL DUTIES. 

Rule 56. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 

Section i. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of 
play. In no instance shall any person, except the Captain of 
the competing teams, be allowed to address him or question his 
decisions, and they can only question him on an interpretation 
of the Rules. No Manager or any other officer of either club 
shall be permitted to go on the field or address the Umpire, 
under a penalty of a forfeiture of a game. 

SEC. 2. Before the commencement of a Game, the Umpire 
shall see that the rules governing all the materials of the Game 
are strictly observed. lie shall ask the Captain of the Home 
Club whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, 
and if there are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, pro- 
vided they do not conflict with any of these rules. 

Sec. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing 
constantly from the commencement of the game to its termina- 
tion, allowing such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by 
accident, injury or rain. lie must, until the completion of the 
game, require the players of each side to promptly take their 
positions in the field as soon as the third man is put out, and 
must require the first striker of the opposite side to be in his 
position at the bat as soon as the fielders are in their places. 

Sec. 4. The Umpire shall count and call every •' Unfair 
Ball " delivered by the Pitcher, and every " Dead Ball," if also 
an unfair ball, as a " Ball," and he shall count and call every 
" Strike." Neither a " Ball " nor a " Strike " shall be counted 
or called until the ball has passed the Home Base. He shall 
also declare every " Dead Ball," "Block," "Foul Hit," "Foul 
Slrike," and "Balk," "Infield" or "Outfield Hit," as pre- 
scribed in Rule 45, Section 9. 



4,4 



PLAYING RULES. 



CALLING "PLAY" AND "TIME." 

RULE 57. The Umpire must call "Play" promptly at the 
hour designated by the Home Club, and on the call of " Play " 
the game must immediately begin. When he calls "Time" 
play shall be suspended until he calls " Play " again, and dur- 
ing the interim no player shall be put out, base be run or run 
be scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only for an acci- 
dent to himself or a player (but in case of accident to a Fielder 
"Time" shall not be called until the ball be returned to and 
held by the Pitcher, standing in his position), or in case rain 
falls so heavily that the spectators are compelled, by the sever- 
ity of the storm, to seek shelter, in which case he shall note the 
time of suspension, and should such rain continue to fall thirty 
minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the game; or to enforce 
order in case of annoyance from spectators. 

Rule 58. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call 
" Time" in case of an accident to himself or a player, a "Block" 
as referred to in Rule 35, Section 3, or in case of rain, as defined 
by the rule. 

INFLICTING FINES. 

Rule 59. The Umpire is empowered to inflict tines of 
not less than $25. 00, nor more than $100.00, for the first offence, 
on players during the progress of a game, as follows: 

Section i. For vulgar, indecent or other improper conduct 
or language. 

SEC. 2. For the Captain or Coacher wilfully failing to re- 
main within the legal bounds of his position, except upon 
an appeal by the captain from the Umpire's decision upon a 
misinterpretation of the rules. 

Sec. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of his 
orders, or for any other violation of these rules. 

Sec. 4. Immediately upon notification by the Umpire that a 
fine has been imposed upon any Manager, Captain or player, 
the Secretary shall forthwith notify the person so fined, and 
also the club of which he is a member, and in the event of the 
failure of the person so fined to pay to the Secretary the amount 
of said fine within five days of notice, he shall be debarred from 
participation in any championship game until such fine is paid. 

SEC. 5. The Umpire may remove a player from the playing 
field for a violation of Section 1 of this rule, in addition to a 
fine, but under no circumstances shall he remove a player for a 
violation of Section 2 of this Rule, unless upon a repetition of 
the offence prescribed therein 

FIELD RULES. 

Rule 60. No club shall allow open betting or pool-selling 
upon its ground, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 



PLAYING ki i.ks. 45 

RULE 6l. No person sliall be allowed upon any part of the 
field during the progress of the game in addition to the players 
in uniform, the Manager on each side and the Umpire; except 
such officers of the law as may be present in uniform, and such 
officials of the Home Club as may be necessary to preserve the 
peace. 

Rule 62. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or player shall 
address the spectators during the progress of a game, except in 
case of necessary explanation, 

RULE 63. Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force 
upon its own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a 
crowd entering the field during the progress of a game, and 
interfering with the play in any manner, the Visiting Club may 
refuse to play further until the field be cleared. If the ground 
be not cleared within fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting 
Club may claim, and shall be entitled to, the game by a score 
of nine runs to none (no matter what number of innings have 
been played). of.neral definitions. 

Rule 64. " Play " is the order of the Umpire to begin the 
game, or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rulf. 65. "Time" is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. 
Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 66. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire 
that the game is terminated. 

Rule 67. An " Inning " is the term at bat of the nine play- 
ers representing a Club in a game, and is completed when three 
of such players have been put out, as provided in these rules. 

Rule 68. A "Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Bats- 
man. It begins when he takes his position, and continues 
until he is put out or becomes a base runner; except when, be- 
cause of being hit by a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal 
delivery by the Pitcher, or in case of a sacrifice hit purposely 
made to the infield which, not being a base hit, advances a 
base runner without resulting in a put out, except to the Bats- 
man, as in Rule 45. 

RULE 69. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required by 
lliese Rules. 

SCORING. 

Rule 70. In order to promote uniformity in scoring cham- 
pionship games the following instructions, suggestions and 
definitions are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are 
required to make all scores in accordance therewith. 

BATTING. 
HON I. The first item in the tabulated score, after the 
player's name and position, shall be the number of times he 
has been at bat during game. The time or times when the 



4 6 



PLAYING RULES. 



player has been sent to base by being bit by a pitched ball, by 
the Pitcher's illegal delivery, or by a base on balls, shall not be 
included in this column. 

Sec. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player. 

SEC. 3. In the third column should be placed the first base 
hits made by each player. A base hit should be scored in the 
fallowing cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the 
foul lines, and out of real li of the Fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a Fielder 
in motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to 
handle the ball before the striker reaches First Base. 

When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he can- 
not handle it in time to put out the Batsman. In case of doubt 
over this class of hits, score a base hit, and exempt the Fielder 
from the charge of an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a Fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the Batsman. 

That in all cases where a Base Runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, the Batsman should be credited with a base hit, 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, 
as defined in Rule 48, Section 5. 

Sec. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice Hits, 
which shall be credited to the Batsman, who, when no one is 
out, or when but one man is out, advances a Runner a base by 
a bunt sacrifice hit, which results in putting out the Batsman, 
or would so result if the ball were handled without error. 
fielding. 

Sec. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a Batsman is 
given out by the Umpire for a foul strike, or where the Bats- 
man fails to bat in proper order, the put out shall be scored to 
the Catcher. 

Sec. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set 
down in the sixth column. An assist should be given to each 
player who handles the ball in assisting a run out or other play 
of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in 
time to put a Runner out, even if the player who could com- 
plete the play fails, through no fault of the plavcr assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handles or assists in any manner in handling the ball from the 
time it leaves the bat until il reaches the player who makes the 
put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each player who throws 
or handles it cleanly, and in such a way that a put out results, 
or would result if no error were made by. the receiver. 



PLAYING RULES. 



47 



ERRORS. 
Sec. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column for 
each misplay which allows the striker or base runner to make 
one or more bases when perfect play would have insured his 
being put out, except that "Wild pitches," "base on balls," 
bases on the Batsman being struck by a "pitched ball," or in 
case of illegal pitched balls, balks and passed balls, shall not 
be included in said column. In scoring errors of batted balls 
see Section 3 of this Rule. 

SEC. 8. Stolen Bases shall be scored as follows: 
Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the Base 
Runner, whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the 
fielder, but any manifest error is to be charged to the fielder 
making the same. If the Base Runner advances another base 
he shall not be credited with a stolen base, and the fielder 
allowing the advancement is also to be charged with an error. 
If the Base Runner makes a start and a battery error is made, 
the runner secures the credit of a stolen base, and the battety 
error is scored against the player making it. Should a Base 
Runner overrun a base and then be put out, he shall receive the 
credit for the stolen base. If a Base Runner advances a base 
on a fly out, or gains two bases on a single base hit, or an infield 
out, or attempted out, he shall be credited with a stolen base, 
provided there is a possible chance and a palpable attempt made 
to retire him. earned runs. 

Sec. 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the player 
reaches the home base unaided by errors before chances have 
been offered to retire the side. 

THE SUMMARY. 

Rule 71. The Summary shall contain: 

Section i. The number of earned runs made by each side. 

Sec. 2. The number of two-base hits made by each player. 

SEC. 3. The number of three-base hits made by each player. 

Sec. 4. Tha number of home runs made by each player. 

SEC. 5- The number of bases stolen by each player. 

Ski :. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by each 
side, and the names of the players assisting in the same. 

Sic. 7. The number of men given bases on called balls by 
each Pitcher. 

Sir. 8. The number of men given bases from being hit by 
pitched balls. 

Ski. (). The number of men struck out. 

SEC. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher. 

Ski'. 11. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher, 

Sec 12. The time of Game. 

Sec. 13. The name of the Umpire, 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



The Ground, 

The Field, 

Catcher's Lines, 

Foul Lines, 

Players' Lines, . . 

The Captain's and Coachers' Lines, 

Three-foot Line, 

Pitcher's Plate, . 

The Bases, 

Batsman's Lines, . 

The Home Base, 

First, Second and Third Bases, 

Lines must be Marked, 

The Ball, 

Weight and Size, 

Number Balls Furnished, 

Furnished by Home Club, 

Replaced if Injured, 
The Bat, 

Material of . 

Shape of 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POS 
Number of Players in Game, 
Players' Positions, . , 

Players not to Sit with Spectators, 
Club Uniforms, 

Gloves, .... 

Players' Benches, 

THE GAME. 
Time of Championship Game, . 
Number of Innings, 
Termination of Game, . 
The Winning Run, .... 
A Tie Game, .... 
A Drawn Game, 
A Called Game, 
A Forfeited Game, .... 

Failure of the Nine to Appear, 

Refusal of One Side to Play, . 

Failure to Resume Playing, 

If a Team Resorts to Dilatory Practice, 

Wilful Violation, 

Disobeying Order to Remove Player, . 

Written Notice to President, 
No Game, ..... 
Substitutes, . . • . 



Rule. 





i 


. . 


2 




3 


. 


4 




5 


• • 


6 




7 


. . 


8 




9 


. . 


IO 




ii 


. 


12 




13 


. 


14 


• (I) 


14 


(2) 


14 


• (3) 


14 


(4) 


14 




15 


• ' (0 


15 


. (2) 

.TTTHMC 


tS 


II 1 H.JINS. 


16 




17 


. 


18 


• (0 


19 


• (2) 


19 


• • 


20 


(I) 


21 


■ Pi 


21 


w 


21 


• (b) 


21 


. 


22 


. 


23 


. 


24 


. 


25 


(0 


25 


• (2) 


25 


(3) 


25 


• (4) 


25 


(5) 


25 


• (6) 


25 


(7) 


25 




26 




27 



Person 



(?) 

(2) 
(3) 






(I 

(2 

(3) 



(I) 

(a) 

(3) 



One or more substitute players, 

iixtra Player, 

]Sase Runner 
Choice of Innings — Condition of Grounds, 
The Pitcher's Position, 
Delivery of the Ball— Fair Ball, 
Unfair Ball, .... 
Balking, ..... 

Motion to Deceive, 

Delay by Holding, 

Pitcher Outside of Lines, 
A Dead Ball, .... 
A Foul Strike, 
Block Balls, .... 

Stopped by Person not in Game, 

Ball Returned, 

Base Runner must Stop, 
The Batsman's Position — Order of Batting, 

Where Players must Remain, 

Space Reserved for Umpire. 

Space Allotted Players "at Bat," 
Batting Rules — Fair Hit, 
Foul Hit, . 
Bunt Hit, 

Batted Ball Outside Grounds, 
A Fair Batted Bail, 
Strikes, .... 

Ball Struck at by Batsman, 

Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher. 

Attempt to Make Foul Hit, 

Foul Hit while Attempting a Bunt Hit 

Ball Struck at after Touching Batsman'! 

Ball Tipped by Batsman, 
A Foul Strike, . 
The Batsman is Out, 

Failing to Take Position al Bal in i >rder, 

Failure to Take Position within One Minute 
being called, .... 

If He Makes a Foul Hit, 

If He Makes a Foul Strike, 

Attempt to Minder Catcher, 

Three Strikes Called by Umpire, 

Attempt to Make a Foul Hit After Two 
have been Called, 

If Ball Hits Him While Making Third Strike, 

If He Hits a Fly Bail that can be Handled By 

[nfielder while First Base Occupied with Only 

1 '»!. • ■ . . (9) 

It Third Strike is Called, . . (io) 



« 

(2) 

(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 



(I) 
after 

(2) 

(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

(&) 

Strikes 

(7) 



ffi 



27 
27 
27 
28 

29 
3° 
31 
32 
32 
32 

32 

33 
34 
35 
35 
35 
35 
36 
37 
37 
37 
38 
39 
40 
4i 
42 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
44 
45 
45 

45 
45 
45 
45 
45 

45 
45 



4S 
45 



BASE RUNNING RULES. 

The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner, 

After a Fair Hit, .... 

After Four Balls are Called, 

After Three Strikes are Declared, 

If Hit by Ball While at Bat, 

After Illegal Delivery of Ball, 
Bases to be Touched, .... 
Entitled to Bases, ..... 

If Umpire Call Four Balls, . 

If Umpire Award Succeeding Batsman Base, . 

If Umpire Calls Balk, 

If Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher, 

Ball Strikes Umpire, 

Prevented from Making Base, . . . 

Fielder Stops Ball, .... 
Returning to Bases, ..... 

If Foul Tip, .... 

If Foul Strike, ..... 

If Dead Ball, .... 

If Person of Umpire Interferes with Catcher, . 

If the Ball Touches the Batsman's Person, . 
Base Runner Out, . ... 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Ball, 

If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball, . 

Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder, 

Touched with Ball After Three Strikes, 

Touching First Base, 

Running from Home Base to First Base, 

Running from First to Second Base, 

Failure to Avoid Fielder, . . , 

Touched by Ball While in Play, 

Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder, 

Batsman Becomes a Base Runner, 

Touched by Hit Ball Before Touching Fielder, 

Running to Base, .... 

Umpire Calls Play, 
When Batsman or Base Runner is Out, 
Coaching Rules, .... 

Scoring of Runs, ..... 

THE UMPIRE. 
The Umpire ..... 

When Master of the Field, 
Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules, 
Special Duties, . . , . 

Is Sole Judge of Play, 

Shall See Rules Observed before Commencing 
Game, ..... (2) 



I 


IULE. 
46 


(I) 


46 


<») 


46 


(3) 


46 


(4) 


46 


(5) 


46 


. 


47 




48 


(i) 


48 


* 


48 


(3) 


48 


(4) 


48 


(5) 


48 


(6) 


48 


(7) 


48 




49 


M 


49 


») 


49 


(3) 


49 


(4) 


49 


(5) 


49 


. 


So 


W 


So 


(») 


50 


(3) 


So 


(4) 


50 


(5) 


So 


(6) 


5° 


(7) 


So 


(8) 


So 


(9) 


So 


(10) 


So 


" 


So 


(12) 


So 


(13) 


5° 


(14) 


So 




51 




52 




S3 




54 


"(0 


55 


(2) 


55 




56 


'(») 


56 



56 



/ 



Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing, 

Must Count and Call Balls, 
Umpire Must Call Play, 
Umpire Allowed to Call Time, . 
Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines, 

For Indecent Language, 

Wilful Failure of Captain to Rcmai 
Bounds, 

Disobedience of a Player, . 

Shall Notify >Captain, . 

Repetition of Offences, 

FIELD RULES. 

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting, 
Who Shall be Allowed in the Field, 
Audience Shall Not be Addressed, 
Every Club shall Furnish Police Force, 

GENERAL DEFINITK 

Play, 

Time, 

Game, 

An Inning, 

A Time at Bat, . 

Legal, 

Scoring, . 

Batting. 

Runs Made, 

Base Hits, 

Sacrifice Hits, 

Fielding, 

Assists, 

Errors, 

Stolen Bases, 

Earned Runs, 
The Summary, . 

Number of Earned Runs, 

Number of Two Base Hits, 

Number of Three Base Hits, 

Number of Home Runs, 

Number of Stolen Bases, 

Number of Double and Triple Plays, 

Bases on Called Balls, 

Bases From being Hit, 

Men Struck < >itl, 

Passed I '.alls. 

Wild Pitches, 

Time of t lame, 

Name i.f Umpire, 



RULE. 


• (3) 


56 


(4) 


56 




57 


. 


58 




59 


: ' (?) 


59 


in within 




• (*) 


59 


(3) 


59 


• (4) 


59 


(5) 


59 




60 




61 




62 




63 




64 




65 


. 


66 




67 




68 




60 




70 


• (0 


70 


<*) 


70 


• (3) 


70 


(4) 


70 


• (5) 


70 


(6) 


70 


• (7) 


70 


(8) 


70 


■ (9) 


70 




71 


• (I) 


71 


(2) 


71 


• (3) 


71 


(4) 


7i 


• (5) 


71 


(6) 


71 


• (7) 


7i 


(8) 


7i 


• (9) 


71 


(IO) 


71 


• (") 


71 


(12) 


7i 


• (13) 


71 






52 



ANNUM. MEETING OF HOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE HOARD OK DIRECTORS OK THE 

NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OK 

PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS HELD AT THE 

FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 

1894. 

Meeting called to order at 10.20 o'clock A. M. 

Present : 

N. E. Young, Chairman ; Messrs. Brush, Soden, Talcott, 
Byrne, Kerr and Mart, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of champion- 
ship games won and lost during the season of 1894. On 
motion, the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Baltimore Base Ball Club, of Baltimore, 
Md., having won the greatest percentage of games in the 
championship series, is hereby awarded the base ball cham- 
pionship of the United States for the year 1894. 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 

The communication of Mr. Lynch was referred to the 
Treasurer with full power to act. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary for three years, at 
his present salary. 

In the matter of the appeal of the Washington Club vs. St. 
Louis, on motion said appeal was laid upon the table. 

On motion adjourned, subject to be reconvened by the 

Chairman. 

N. E. YOUNG, Chairman. 



A. II. Soden, 
John T. Brush, 
C. II. Byrne, 
James a. Hart, 



Diredors. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF national LEAG1 v.. 53 

Annual Meeting of National League. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMEKICAN 

ASSOCIATION OK PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CUIUS HELD 

AT THE FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, NEW YORK, 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER I4, I894. 

Meeting called to order at 1.35 >'■ M - 

Present: 

A. II. Soden and YV. A. Conant, representing the Boston 
liase Ball Association. 

C. Von der Ahe, representing the St. Louis liase Ball Asso- 
ciation. 

E. B. Talcott and C. C. Van Cott, representing the National 
Exhibition Company. 

W. W. Kerr and P. L. Auten, representing the Pittsburg 
Athletic Company. 

F. De H. Robison, representing the Cleveland liase Hall 
Company. 

J. George Ruckstuhl, representing the Louisville liase Ball 
Company. 

H. R. Von der Horst and Edward Ilanlon, representing the 
Baltimore Base Ball and Exhibition Company. 

John J. Rogers and A. J. Reach, representing the Phila- 
delphia Ball Club. 

C. II. Byrne and E. A. Abel!, representing the Brooklyn 
liase Ball Club. 

J. T. Brush and N. A. Lloyd, representing the Cincinnati 
Base Ball Club. 

G. W. Wagner and J. Earle Wagner, representing the Na- 
tional Washington Base Ball Club. 

James A. Hart, representing the Chicago Ball Club. 

On motion the reading of minutes of previous meetings was 
dispensed with. 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and 
accepted. 



J 



54 



ANNUAL MKKTIN'O O* NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



The following amendments were made to the League Consti- 
tution. (See Constitution.) 

Messrs. Hanlon, Robison and Hart were appointed a Com- 
mittee on Rules. 



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, I894. 

Meeting called to order at 11.45 A - M - 

The following named gentlemen were appointed a Committee 
on Rules, viz.: Edward Hanlon, F. De H. Robison and James 
A. Hart. 

It was unanimously agreed that when this meeting adjourns 
it adjourns to meet at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, in New York 
City, on last Wednesday ill February, 1895, at 12 o'clock noon. 

On motion a committee of three was appointed, consisting of 
John T. Brush, F. De II. Robison and John I. Rogers, to con- 
sider and report upon the agreement with Philadelphia. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected President for three years, 
with same salary. 

The following named gentlemen were selected as Directors 
for the ensuing year, viz.: A. II. Soden, C. II. Byrne, James A. 
Hart, John T. Brush, Chris Von der Ahe and II. R. Von dcr 
Ilorst. 

The following named gentlemen were elected members of the 
National Board: A. II. Soden, C. II. Byrne, N. E. Young. 

The following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That the Committee on Rules be instructed to re- 
port at the Spring meeting such amendments as may be neces- 
sary to compel the umpire to enforce the Playing Rules, par- 
ticularly those prohibiting noisy coaching or rowdy or disor- 
derly conduct on the ball field. 

Resolved, That the special agreement with the Philadelphia 
Ball Club, relating to the division of gate receipts and grand 
stand admissions, dated February 27, 1894, be suspended for 
four years from this date, and, in lieu thereof, the division of 
gate receipts prevailing in 1893 be substituted during said four 
years. • ■ ■ 



ANNUAL MEETINO OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



55 



On motion the annual passes were renewed for 1895, and, in 
lieu of cards, coupon books substituted. 

Mr. Harry Wright was elected chief of the staff of Umpires 
for one year, with same salary. 

Mr. Henry Chadwick was unanimously elected an Honorary 
Member, and a committee, consisting of Messrs. Byrne, Young, 
and Reach, was appointed to draw up suitable resolutions (the 
same to be engrossed). The following is the motion as pre- 
sented: 

On motion of Mr. C. H. Byrne, of the Brooklyn club, Mr. 
Henry Chadwick, in consideration of his long and faithful 
service in behalf of promoting and developing base ball as the 
National game, and as a recognition of the service this League 
owes to the Press of the country, was unanimously elected an 
Honorary Member of the National League and American 
Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Adjourned to meet at 10 A. M. on the following day. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER l6, 1894. 



Meeting called to order at 10.30 A. It. 

On motion, a committee of five was appointed to prepare an 
address in relation to the so-called new American Association, 
who after due and careful consideration and deliberation, 
submitted the following report: 
To the National Board op Professional Bask Ball Associations : 

From the year 1876, when base ball was established in this country on * 
substantial and responsible basis by the disbandment of the so-called 
National Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs and the Organization 
of the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, down to the present 
time theduty has been imposed upon some body or organization to uphold 
and enforce the objects for which base ball was established, to wit 

First— To perpetuate base ball as the national game of the United State*, 
and ti> surround it with such safeguards as to warrant for the future absolute 
public confidence in its integrity and methods. .... 

Second— To protect and promote the mutual interests of professional base 
ball clubs and professional base ball players. ... . . 

The National League formed in 1876 found a difficult task before it in 



gO ANNUAL MKKi I.V. "1 NATIONAL 11. 

undertaking to carry out the objects above referred to. Interest in base ball 
Rras at low ebb. Gamblers were in possession. The game was without 
discipline, organization or legitimate control. The Bpott was conducted with 
dishonest methods and for dishonest purposes, and had neither the respect 
nor confidence of the press or public. Heroic methods were absolutely 
necessary. At a meeting of the National League, held in Cleveland Decem- 
ber 5, 1877, the League directors unanimously ratified the action of the Louis- 
ville club in expelling from the professional ranks James A. Devlin, W. H. 
Craver, A. H. Nichols and G. W. Hall " for conduct in contravention of the 
object of the League." 

These men had been charged with and convicted of wilfully selling a game 
of base ball. At first the action of the League in taking such an extreme 
course was strongly denounced. The League, however, foresaw that any 
condonation of fraud or crookedness meant death to the national game and 
remained firm in its position. Public opinion soon turned, and to-day it is 
universally conceded that the course then taken did more to establish the 
honesty and integril all than any action taken or legislation since 

enacted. From that day to this n or dishonesty has 

n made against a professional ball player. Repeated attempts have 
been made to reinstate these men or those of them now living, but their 
expulsion was final and Irrevocable. 

That the League was earnest in its efforts to purify the game was further 
demonstrated by its action taken at a special meeting held at the Russell 
House, Detroit, Mich., on June 24, 1882, when Richard Higham, a League 
umpire, was, upon charges preferred by the Detroit club, expelled for 
" crooked " work as an umpire. ^ From that day to this no such charge has 
ever been made against an official umpire. The rapid increase in the corn- 

Eensation of ball players soon opened up another avenue of trouble for the 
league, which needed and received prompt attention. This was flagrant and 
open dissipation in the ranks at home and abroad. While this was confined 
comparatively to a few men, the innocent suffered largely from it, and the 
National League was brought into disrepute. Heroic measures were again 
adopted, and several players, were indefinitely suspended, with excellent 
effect. It is safe to say that to-'day there is less dissipation and drunkenness 
in the ranks of professional ball players in proportion to their number than in 
any other organized or unorganized body in this country identified with out- 
door sports. 

The success achieved by the National League in its efforts to develop base 
ball as the national game became apparent in its rapid growth in popular 
favor, and the establishment oi clubs and associations throughout the various 
States. It became evident soon that something must be done to foster and 
protect the rights and interests of thesevarious bodies, and '* that there was a 
recognized need of some central power in base ball to govern all associations, 
by an equitable code of general laws, to put the game on a prosperous and 
lasting basis." 

To accomplish this purpose a meeting was held in the Fifth Avenue Hotel, 
New York, February 17, 1883, at which delegates were present representing 
the National League, the American Association and the Northwestern 
League. At that meeting the so-called Tripartite Agreement was drawn up 
and agreed to, which substantially was an offensive and defensive alliance, 
embodying a mutual respect "f all contracts and oilier obligations, and all 
if the parties to the agreement to territorial rights, players under con- 
tract or held under reserve. 

The adoption of this tripartite agreement opened a new era in baseball, 
and it was so readily recogniaed as being a step in the line of progress that 
when the committee which drew up the agreement was called together in 
New York city in October, 1883, they decided to call the instrument they had 
framed the National Agreement of Professional Kase Ball Clubs, the purpose 
being to open the door to all clubs, leagues and associations desiring to live 
under the conditions, rules and regulations of the agreement. Immediately 
several leagues and associations applied for the protection assured them, and 



ANNUAL MEETING OK NATIONAL I.KA'.l I. 



57 



readily pledged themselves to abide by the requirements designated in the 
nest. 

The action of the committee in framing the new national agreement was 
subsequently ratified by the signatures of the Presidents of the parties 
thereto, viz.: 

The National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, A. G. Mills, Presi- 
dent, November 22, 1883. 

The American Association of Base Ball Clubs, H. 1). McKnight, President, 
December 13, 1883. 

The Northwestern League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, Klias Mather. 
President, January to, 1884. 

The Eastern League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, William C. Sedden, 
President, February io, 1884. 

The fundamental principle of the national agreement as originally drawn, 
and which is now in operation, is a respect for territorial rights. This, in 
fact, is the corner stone of the structure. 

It contemplates and provides for tlu- organization of cities into leagues or 
associations, with one elub, and one only, in each <;ity, and a contest between 
the respective cities for championship honors. The interest which base ball 
arouses in any city is based absolutely on local pride. The essence of value 
to a championship is entirely to the city to which the victorious club belongs. 

Experience has demonstrated that whenever and wherever territorial 
rights have been invaded and rival clubs established, the element of local 
pride is absent and interest in both destroyed. It is this which makes a 
respect for territorial rights a principle which we must uphold. 

It is true, nevertheless, and we so declare that we will gladly welcome and 
shall encourage the formation of leagues and associations who desire to 
operate under the national agreement, and consent to abide by the funda- 
mental principles of that document. 

Reference has been made above to the difficulties and the obstacles which 
at times have presented themselves and which have been byseveie but just 
methods removed. 

To-day the future of base ball is confronted by a new condition, a condi- 
tion which in every particular is as harmful and in many respects far more 
dangerous than open dishonesty or flagrant dissipation. That is, treachery 
within the lines. To-day, and for months past we have had men identified 
with professional base ball who for years have been the beneficiaries of the 
game, have received liberal compensation for the work they have done, 
earned their livelihood entirely and absolutely from the opportunities afforded 
them by clubs and organizations operating under the national agreement, 
and we find and now know that these men, during this time, have persistently 
been identifying themselves with schemes and combinations the objects 
and sole purposes of which are to weaken and perhaps destroy the splendid 
fabric of our national game, which it has taken years of effort, anxiety and 
large outlay of capital to construct. 

To-day we have the confidence of the public and the press of the country in 
the methods and the integrity of base ball in larger measure than at any 
prior period in the history of our national game. It devolves upon us to con- 
tinue to deserve and retain this confidence. We must endeavor to do it. 

The interests of clubs and professional ball players are identical. One can- 
not succeed without the other. Success means mutual benefit. The moment 
any suspicion attaches to base ball, public confidence lost or even chilled, the 
occupation of the ball player is gone. We must all stand or fall together. 
There is no middle ground. We stand by the fundamental law, OUT national 
agreement, which guarantees protection to players as well as to clubs, or we 
destroy it. One road leads to the perpetuation of the national game, the 
other to its decline. There should be no place, no standing room in base ball 
for any anarchistic element which never aids in building up but is ever ready 
to destroy. 

The time has come when some action should be taken to place this element 
without the pale of our ranks. 



5S 



ANNUAL MEETING "K NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



The National Board, operating under the national agreement, was created 
to protect and guard the interests of all players, clubs and associations iden- 
tified with the agreement. Any attempt to encroach upon that, to nullify or 
affect any of its provisions, is of direct and material concern to all alike. 

The obligations of contracts, the right of reserve, and the territorial rights 
of clubs, associations and leagues must be upheld, and shall be, at any cost. 
It is a matter of public rumor and is also a fact which has come to our 
knowledge that men identified with clubs, members of the national agree- 
ment, have been co-operating in the formation of clubs or organizations 
whose purpose is to conflict with the national agreement. In view of this 
knowledge, the National League and American Association of Professional 
Clubs In convention assembled respectfully suggests to and requests tht 
National Board to declare A. C. Buckenberger, William Barnic and 1'reO 
Pfeffer ineligible to be employed either as manager or player or in any 
capacity whatever, by any club or organization operating under the national 
agreement, and they be forthwith suspended. Such suspension to remain in 
force until such time as they or cither of them can satisfy the National 
Board that they have in no way been engaged directly or indirectly in the 
organization of any club, league or association formed or to be formed in con- 
flict with the principles of the national agreement. And in the event of their 
failure to relieve themselves from this suspension within such time as your 
Board may direct, they shall be expelled and forever debarred from any con- 
nection with clubs or organizations identified with the National Agreement 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

We furthermore request that your Board take like action in the case of any 
player, manager, umpire or club official who in the future identifies himself 
with a similar movement. 

C. H. BYRNE, 

I. T. BRUSH, 

JAMES A. HART, 

H. R. VON DER HORST, 

N. E. YOUNG. 

The above address was submitted to the National League at 
its annual meeting, fully discussed and unanimously adopted. 
Appended is the decision of the National Board : 

To all National Agreement Clubs, Leagues and Associations: 

At a meeting of the National Board of Professional Base Ball Clubs, held 
in New York city November 16, 1894, a communication was received from the 
National League and American Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs, 
in convention assembled, requesting this Board to take action in the case of 
Certain individuals heretofore identified with clubs operating under the 
national agreement who have been charged with treachery to their employers 
and the organizations with which they have been identified. # The request. ••> 
presented, was supplemented by an appeal from the executive officers of the 
Eastern League of Base Bali Clubs and the Western League of Base Ball 
Clubs to take such action as was proper to protect said leagues in the rights 
assured them under the national agreement. 

After mature consideration, and governed absolutely by a desire to comply 
with the letter and spirit of the requests made to this Board, and having 
reasonable and substantial evidence upon which to base our action. 

This Board has decided to announce, and it does declare that A. C. Buck- 
enberger, Willian Barnle and Krcd Pfeffer are ineligible to be employed 
either as manager, player or In any other capacity by any club or organiza- 
tion identified with the national agreement, and said persons are nereby 
declared suspended. 

This Board further declares that such suspension shall remain in force up 
to and including December 31, 1894, and in the event of the failure of the 
above named persons, or either of them, on or before the above named date, 
to show to this Board that he or they have been in no manner, directly or in- 



ANNUM. MEETING OK NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



59 



directly, engaged in any attempt to promote the organization of clubs, leagues 
or associations antagonistic to the national agreement, they shall be expelled 
and forever debarred from any connection with clubs or organized bodies 
operating under the national agreement. 

N. K. YOUNG, 
A. H. SODF.N, 
C. H. BYRNE. 

The foregoing action was partially caused by the following 
communication : 

New York, November 15, 1894. 
To the National League and American Association of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs. 

Gentltmrn : ^ We the representatives of the undersigned leagues, operating 
under the National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs, respectfully 
submit the following: Your body is the recognized major base ball organi- 
zation of the country, and have sole right to elect the National Board and 
control all bodies idcntilicd with the agreement. 

It has been made known to us, and we have good and substantial reasons 
for believing that such knowledge is correct, that a new organization of base 
ball clubs is contemplated, which, of necessity, must operate without the 
pale of thenational agreement.^ It appears also that it is the purpose of the 
new association, if it materializes, to attempt to take from our respective 
organizations and clubs players now held by us under the right of reserva- 
tion accorded us by the national agreement. We therefore request that you, 
as a body, take some action to protect us, so far as possible, against all out- 
side organizations. We trust you will give this immediate attention, and we 
await your action. Respectfully, 

B. 1!. JOHNSON, Sec. Western League, P. B. B.C. 
P. T. POWERS, Pres. Eastern League. 

The following resolutions were adopted : 

Resolved, That the National League and American Associa- 
tion of Professional Base Ball Clubs has heard with sincere 
regret of the death of Peter J. Donohue. For many years this 
able gentleman and congenial friend has been known to all 
identified with this organization as an earnest friend and sup- 
porter of base ball, an able writer in its behalf, at times a 
severe critic, but always fair, just and true. We desire there- 
fore as a body to place on record the fact that in the death of 
Mr. Peter J. Donohue base ball, and all other manly sports, 
have lost an able advocate and a loyal friend. We hereby 
extend to the good mother and sisters he has left behind, our 
sincere condolence for the affliction with which they have been 
visited. 

On motion, the present arrangement as to free passes was 
continued for one year. 



f>0 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



On motion, the vote on the issuance of coupon books was 
reconsidered, and the same form of ticket as was used in 1894 
adopted, the number being reduced to ten to each club, includ- 
ing same number to the President. 

On motion, the communication of Messrs. Powers and John- 
son was received and ordered placed on file. 

On motion, the contract with the Sporting Life Publishing 
Company was annulled or abrogated and the Secretary was 
instructed not to furnish any more advertising matter. 

On motion adjourned. N. E. VOUNG, 

President and Secretary, 



ANNUAL MEETING OK NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



(■I 



RECONVENED ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL BASE HALL CLUBS, 
HELD AT THE FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, 
FEBRUARY 27, 

Meeting called to order at I P. M. 

Present: 

A. H. Soden and W. II. Conant, representing the Boston 
Base Hall Association. 

Chris Von der Ahe, representing the St. Louis Base Ball As- 
sociation. 

Andrew Freedman and J. W. Spalding, representing the Na- 
tional Exhibition Company. 

\V. W. Kerr, representing the Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

Edward Hanlon, representing the Baltimore Base Ball and 
Exhibition Company. 

Dr. Thomas Hunt Stucky, representing the Louisville Base 
Ball Company. 

A. J. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Phila- 
delphia Ball Club. 

James A. Hart, representing the Chicago League Ball Club. 

F. A. Abell and Charles II. Byrne, representing the Brooklyn 
Base Ball Club. 

John T. Brush, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

George W. Wagner and J. Earle Wagner, representing the 
National Washington Base Ball Club. 

On motion the reading of minutes of previous meeting was 
dispensed with. 

The Playing Rules Committee submitted their report, and the 
rules, as amended, were adopted as follows (see Playing Rules). 

The following agreement was unanimously adopted and 
signed by every League club: 

We the undersigned, members of the National League and American 
Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs, heteby covenant* promise and 
agree, each with each other, that we will not, directly or indirectly, relieve 
or indemnify any of our respective players from the full penalty of fines that 
may be inflicted hy the President or Secretary of the LeagBa amlcr the 
League constitution, or by any Umpire under the playing rales of the 
League; and thai such fines shall be charged to and deducted Ironi the 



62 



ANNUAL MEETING OK NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



salaries due said players and never thereafter refunded to them, directly or 
indirectly, in the form of bonus, gift, increase of salary, or otherwise. A 
violation of this agreement shall forfeit to the League treasury from the 
undersigned club member in default a sum equivalent to ten times the line or 
fines imposed upon players in the manner aforesaid, and assumed or paid 
directly or indirectly by the club member or members holding contract or 
contracts with such player_ or players. Such violation of this agreement 
shall be ascertained and decided by the Board of Directors of the League In 
the same manner and under the same rules and regulations prescribed in the 
League constitution for their investigation and bearing. 

The Secretary presented the following petition from Mr. 
Fred Pfeffer, asking for reinstatement: 

N. E. Young, Esq.: 

Dear Sir: I respectfully petition the National League through you to 
recommend to the National Hoard the removal of my disabilities and that I 
be restored to good standing in said League. I am willing, personally or by 
the President of the Louisville Base Hall Company, to appear before VOU1 
honorable body at any time you may name, and I hereby pledge my alle- 
giance to the national agreement. Very respectfully, 

Fe.ikuary 27, 1895. FRED PFEFFER. 

On motion Messrs. Brush, Hart and Freedman were ap- 
pointed a committee to consider the petition of Mr, Pfeffer. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That it is with sincere regret that the delegates to 
this meeting of the National League and American Association 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs find that they have been de- 
prived of the presence of Mr. Frank De Mass Robison, Presi- 
dent of the Cleveland Base Ball Club, to take part in our pro- 
ceedings. His absence has been occasioned by the death of his 
father, and this body desires to extend to President Robison its 
sympathy and condolence in this day of deep affliction. 

On motion adjourned to meet on the following day. 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1895. 

Meeting called to order at 1.35 p.m. 

The communication of Mr. E. Kreusler, requesting that the 
League send a team to Australia at the close of the present 
season, was referred to a committee, consisting of Messrs. Hart, 
Byrne and Freedman, with instructions to report at the next 
meeting as to the practicability and advisability of complying 
with their request. 

The committee appointed to consider the appeal of Mr. 
Pffeffer: After a protracted and lengthy discussion, the follow- 
ing decision was agreed to, and the National Board directed to 
formulate a decision in accordance therewith as follows: 

At a meeting of the National League held in New York February 28, 1896, 
a recommendatiun was presented to this Board by the League, requesting 
the Board to remove the decree of ineligibility imposed on Fred Pfeffer by 
the Board at a meeting held in New York December 38, 18!K. The recom- 
mendation was accompanied by a written request from 1'feffer, which re- 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 63 

ipcctfully asks for a hearing before the National League and for a removal 
of his disability, and also pledging his allegiance for the future to the 
national agreement, and a suggestion to this Board that Pfeffer be reinstated 
as an eligible ball player, and th<: term* and conditions on which such rein- 
statement should he based. This Board in compliance with such recom- 
mendation and holding in great respect the large number of petitions and 
personal appeals made in Pfeffer's behalf, has by a unanimous vote agreed 
1 1 > remove the disability imposed on Pfeffer upon the following conditions: 

This Hoard, in removing the disability of Pfeffer, assigns him to the 
Louisville club for the season of 1895, and he will during the said season, be 
Ineligible to play with any club of any League or Association under the 
national agreement except the said Louisville club. Pfeffer is also required 
to pay to the Secretary of the National League the sum of $500, said amount 
to he paid in semi-monthly instalments during the playing season of 1866. 
Any failure to comply with this requirement will render Pfeffer ineligible to 
play with said Louisville club, notice of such ineligibility to be promulgated 
at the discretion of the Chairman of this Board. 

N. E. Young, Chairman; 
C. H. Byrne, 
A. H. Soden. 

The Schedule Committee submitted his report, which was 
agreed to. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

N. E. YOUNG, 
President and Secretary, 



6 4 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



Officers and Players. 

The following is an official list of the officers of the 
National League and American Association of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs, and officers and players of clubs, members 
thereof, for the season of 1895, so far as completed to March, 
1895. N. E. YOUNG, President and Secretary. 

Box 536, Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS. 

II.R.VonderHorst, C. H. Byrne, 
A. IL.Soden, James A. Hart, 



Chris Von der Ahe, 
John T. Brush. 

CHICAGO BASE BALL CLUB, CHICAGO, ILL. 

James A. Hart, President, John A. Brown, Secretary. 

Suite 54, Hartford Building. 

Adrian C. Anson, Captain and Manager. 



B. W. Abbey, George A. Decker, W. F. Dahlen, 

Clark Griffith, \V. F. Hutchinson, C. E. Irwin, 

M. J. Kittredge, W. A. Lange, William Moran, 

James Ryan, William Schriver, C. Scott Stratton, 

Asa Stewart, William H. Terry, W. R. Wilmot. 

— . Griffin, 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, BOSTON, MASS. 

A. H. Soden, President, J. B. Billings, Treasurer, 

No. 116 Water St. Box 1751. 

Charles W. Ganzell, George F. Hodson, R. L. Lowe, 

H. C. Long, Thos. F. McCarthy C. R. Nyce, 

J. B. Ryan, J. E. Stivetts, James Sullivan, 

Thomas J. Tucker, John J. Warner, Hugh Duffy. 



W. M. Nash, 



James Collins, 



r.KOOKLYN BASE BALL CLUB, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

C. II. Byrne, President. F. A. Abf.ll, Treasurer. 

Eastern Base Ball Park. 



John Anderson, 
T. P. Daly, 
David L. Foutz, 
Henry F. Hines, 
Joseph Mulvey, 
E. !•'. Stein, 



Frank A. Bnriell, 
Daniel Daub, 
John II. Grim, 
George LaChance, 

William Shindle, 
George Tredway, 



Thomas Burns, 
C. F. Dailey, 
A. C. Gumbert, 
Con C. Lucid, 
George Q_ Shock. 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



65 



BALTIMORE BASE BALL CLUB, 

Edward Hanlon, President. II. R 

No. 9 Soulli St 



\V. Robinson, 
W. Hoffer, 
II. fennings, 

\\. (lark, 
W. Gleason, 
J. McGraw, 



J. McMahon, 

F, Horner, 

F. Homier, 

G. Hemming, 

G. Carey, 
J. Kelly, 



BALTIMORE, MD. 
Von der Horst, 

Treasurer. 

C. II. Esper, 

D. Brouthers, 
W. Brodie, 
W. Kissengen, 
II. Reitz, 

W. Keeler. 



CLEVELAND BASE BALL COMPANY, CLEVELAND, <>. 
]•'. DeH. Robison, J. 



I >i,ii. Robison, 

President. 



[esse Burkett, 
Frank ( rriffith, 
D. F. Young, 
('. L. Zimmer, 
R. J. Wallace, 



II. C. Blake, 
Ed. ( Ircuingcr, 
J. O'Connor, 
James McGarr, 
James McAleer, 



Howard Robison, 

Treasurer. 

George Cuppy, 
George Tebeau, 
Thad Tray, 
Oliver Tebeau. 



CINCINNATI BASK BALL CLUB, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



John T. Brush, President. 



N. A. Lloyd, Treasurer. 



I. K. Canavan, 
W. T. Cray, 
George Hogriever, 

T. W. Parrot t, 



Court and Plum Sts. 
Frank Dwyer, F. J. Foreman, 

\V. II. Me'rritt, J. \V. Holliday, 

M. A. Latham, E. McFarland, 

W. C. Phillips, Henry Spies. 



NEW YORK BASK BALL CLUB, NEW YORK. 



\. FREEDMAN, President. II. A. BoNNELL, Secretary. 

39 and 41 Cortlandt St. 
Thomas E. Bannon, W. II. Clark, 
J. J. Doyle, Charles Farrell, 

L. S. German, Park A. Wilson, 

J. Meekin, \V. 11. Murphy, 

James Stafford, M. J. Tiernan. 



E. I). Burke, 
George S. Davis, 
W. B. Fuller, 

Frank Knauss, 

Amos Rusie, 

C. E. Van Haltren, 



PHILADELPHIA BASE BALL CLUB, PHILADELPHIA. 

A. J. REACH, John 1. ROGERS, Treasurer, 

President 138 South 6th St. 

A. A. Irwin, Manager. 
J. A. Boyle, K. I). Buckley, M. E. Baldwin, 

E. Beam, John Clements, W, Carsey, 



66 



OFFICERS AM) PLAYERS. 



E. J. Delehanty, M. Grady, 

W. R. Hamilton, Lave Cross, 

Lewis Johnson, C. T. Reilly, 

Thomas K. Smith, S. L. Thompson, 
John B. Taylor, 

LOUISVILLE BASE BALL CLUB, LOUISVILLE, KY. 



G. Weyhing, 
\V. W. llallman, 
Joseph J. Sullivan, 
G. A. Turner. 



Dr. Thomas Hunt 

George Borchers, 

John \V. Glasscock, 

Bert Inks, 

Phil Knell, 

J. J. McCloskey, 

W. Preston, 

J. K. Virtue, 



Si i CKY, 
President. 
F. (lark, 

Thomas Gettinger, 
A. C. Jantzen, 
John S. Luby, 
M. McDermott, 
F. Shugart, 
James T. Welch, 



B. Dreyfuss, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
H. Cote, 
Arthur Herman, 
Fred Zahner, 
A. McGann, 
John J. O'Brien, 
Daniel Sweeny, 
J. L. Wadsworth. 



PITTSBURGH BASE BALL CLUB, PITTSBURGH, PA. 



\V. W. Kerr, President. 



SoS Liberty St. 



Louis Bierbauer, 
Monte Cross, 
E. P. Ilawley, 
Frank Killen, 
William Niles, 
Jacob Stenzel, 



Thus. B. Colcolough, W. F. Clingman, 
P. J. Donovan, F. Genins, 

William Hart, Harry Jordan, 

William Kling, John Menefee, 

Joseph Sugden, Elmer E. Smith. 



ST. LOUIS BASE BALL CLUB, ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Chris Von der Ahe, President, 2Sog Grand Ave. 



Theo. Breitenstein, 
F. W. Ely, 
Dennis Lyons, 
J. II. McDougal, 
A. Twineham, 



A. II. Clarkson, 
Thomas Flanagan, 
E. Mason, 

Joseph Quinn, 
C. II. Peitz, 



Thomas F. Dowd, 
M. F. Hogan, 
George F. Miller, 
Harry Staley, 
Richard Coolcy. 



NATIONAL WASHINGTON BASE BALL CLUB. 

G. II. SCHMELZ, 

Manager. 
J. Eaki.k W AGNES, Treasurer. 



George W. Wagner, 

President 



Varncy Anderson, 
Charles J. Crooks, 
Henry A. Krumm, 
John Mullarky, 

T. C. Nicholson. 



( . A. Abbey, 
\V. I.. Ilassamer, 
\V. b. Mercer, 
I). |. Mahoney, 
0. il. Stockdale, 



J. H. Boyd, 
Frank I louseman, 
Albert Maul, 
James Magnire, 
Albert Selbach. 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 



6? 



LEAGUE OFFICIAL AVERAGES FOR 1894. 

The following tables aie those made up by Secretary N. K. 
Young, of the National League, and they present the best 
analysis of the season's play in the League championship series. 
It will be seen that the batting record given below places Duffy, 
of the Bostons, in the lead (percentage .43S), with four 1'hila- 
delphians, Turner, Thompson, Delehanty and Hamilton follow- 
ing in the order named. Anson was in his old-time form during 
last season and was sixth with a percentage of .394. Slratton led 
the pitchers, with a percentage of .931 ; Zimmer, the catchers, 
with .931 ; Motz, the first basemen, with .995, Anson being 
second with .9S8 ; ReitZ, the second basemen, with .966 ; Nash, 
the third basemen, with .932 ; Glasscock, the short stops, with 
.934, and Dungan, the outfielders, with .970. 



Qattinc: Record 

in- PLAYERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PART IN FIFTEEN OR More 
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES — SEASON ok 1S94. 



Huffy 

Turner 

Thompson 

Delehatuy 

Hamilton 

Anson 

Kelley 

Cross 

Tenny 

Holliday 

Brotlie 

Doyle 

Keelcr 

Griffin 

Childs 

Grady 

Dahlcn 

Ryan 

Burns 

Burkett 

McKean 

Smith 

Stenzel 

F.arle 

Stratton 

McCarthy 

Nicol 

Robinson 

Davis 



Cl-un. 



Boston 

Philadelphi 1 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Baltimore. . . 
Philadelphi 1 

Boston 

Cincinnati 1122 

Baltimore 129 

New Yor!c 105 

Baltimore 138 

It Hi 
III 
BO 
181 
11)8 

121; 
124 
i:» 
125 
131 
83 
83 
126 



94 167 
184 218 
128148 
144 174 
1871 45 68 



Brookly 
Cleveland . . . 

Phil adelphia 
Chicago 

' o 

Brooklyn . . . 
Cleveland. . . 
Cleveland. . . 
Pittsburgh .. 

Pittsburgh 181 6881148 

Brooklyn and Louisville... .13 114 23 

Chicago anil Louisville 83)184)40 

Boston 126 686 IIP 

Louisville I 2K 1131 1:.' 

Baltimore 10ti;420 71 

New York Il24 4<ts! 134 ! 1T0 



6S 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES, 
E \ i i iv. records Continued, 



Brouthers.. 
Joyce 

.Icy.... 

■■■•tus. . . 

Mullatic 

( rleaSOU . . . 

Miller 

1 .owe 

Mi i ,raw. . . 

Daly 

Inks 

Sullivan.. . 

Connaughton. 
Harmon - . 
Stivetts . . 

Tread way. 
Sugden 
Van Haltren. 
Jennings. . .. 

Taylor 

Wilmot 

La Chance .. 

Wilson 

Parrott. ... 
Tucker 

Mailman.. .. 

Kassamer.. 

Lange 

Long 

Terry 

Hutchinson.. . 
McPhce.-... 
Shock — 
O'Connor.. 

Abbey 

Kittredge.. 
Twineb.un. 

i looser 

Latham .... 
Hoy 

Ilartman. . , 

Lyons 

Foutz 

Decker. 

Vaughn — 

Selbach 

Stockdale.. 
Donovan.. . 
Reiti. 

Ely 

0. Tebeau, -■ 
Mel '.nire 



Baltimore. . . 

Washington 

Pittsburgh .. 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore and Cleveland 

Baltimore and St. Louis. 

St. Louis.. - 

Boston 

Baltimore. ■ 

Brooklyn. 
Baltimore and Louisville 
Wash'gtoo and Plul'dclph 
Boston 

■:i 

Boston 

Brooklyn . . . 
Pittsburgh. . 
New York.. . 
Baltimore. . . 
Philadelphia. 
Chicago. 
Brooklyn.. . . 
New York... 
Cincinnati. . 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 
Washington. 

i Ihicago 

Boston. .. 
Chicago.... 

Chicago 

Cincinnati.. 
Brooklyn.. . . 
Cleveland. .. 
tington. 
Chicago 

St. Louis 

New York and St 

Cincinnati. 

( !■■ .in iati 

Pittsburgh. 

Pittsburgh.. 

Brooklyn. .. 

i - ; 

Cincinnati*. 

Washington 

Washington 

Pittsburgh.. 

Baltimore. - 

Si. Louis. . . 

Cleveland.. , 

Washington 



1 o 



123 528 

;is :(;,;' 
132 534 
47 172 

ik or 

81 111 
125 BO 

I ,.; US 
123 515 
123 194 

24 KU 

■ . I 

88 165 

is. m 

:,; 2 i i 
122 182 



187 
108 
122 
25 
8 
xj l 
93 
585 HO 
115178 
135 I,: - 
12 
126 
56 
167 
82 
162 

4r 

177 

ins 
48 
201 
86 
59 



110 51b 

110408 



I.-; 


n; 


K 


lit: 


475 


186 


25 


:ii, 


I'.i 


84 


183 


28 


128 


181 


118 


68 


287 


■411 


Rfl 


82 1 


(17 


129 


52 1 


05 


60 161 


:n, 


31 127 


23 


iai iea 


'.,:> 


.•in 582 


[82 


128 508 


lis 


49 186 


II 


72 25 1 


61 


, 3 


n 


89 891 


76 


In 275 


18 


96 872 


70 


19 76 


i 


138 575 


Hi, 


109 ir.o 


hi; 


■;; 508 


85 


19 601 


79 


103 


>•;; 


67 



88 
180 

68 
[24 

~'l 
Hi) 
186 
2] 
187 
47 
85 
5(1 
112 M 
111 170 
106 181 
I IS 
154 
31 
43 
154 
70 
III-, 
nit; 
r,:: 
40 
145 
107 
I5fc 
68 
71 
92 
121 

6C 

lit 

28 

176 
138 
165 
158 
180 



H 

H 

:s; [8 
230 5 
284 2~ 
8 

1 
4 



85 

65 
228 
828 
221 
■::•:, 
80 
166 
70 
257 
188 
264 

231 
832 246 
881 68 
831294 
329 L2b 
829 



■ I] i [CIA1 IVRRAGKS. 

batting records — Continued. 



60 



Chamberlain.. 

Ward 

Gumbcrt 

Corcoran 

Irwin 

Bierbauer-. . . . 

Anderson 

Bonner 

Hawke 

German 

Merritt 

Shindle 

Kennedy 

Burke 

Cooley 

Kinslow 

McAleer 

PfefEer 

Flaherty 

DuDgan 

Mercer 

Nash 

Canavan 

Lake 

Cartwright. . . 
Boyle.... 

Grimm 

Smith 

Blake 

McMahon. . . . 

Shugart 

Knell 

Zimmer 

Fuller 

Glasscock .. . . 

Nichols 

Tiernan 

Farrell 

Mcckin 

Ganzel 

Carsey 

Rusk 

Shicbeck 

Clark 

Pcilz 

Quinn 

Denny 

Hawley 

Reilly 

urke. . . . 

Mci i:irr, 

Murphy 



Club. 



Cincinnati 

Washington 

Pittsburgh 

Brooklyn 

Chicago 

Pittsburgh 

Brooklyn 

Baltimore 

II.ilLimi.iro 

New York 

Boston and Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

New York 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 

Louisville 

Louisville 

i Lie and Chicago 

Washington 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

Louisville 

ton 

Philadelphia 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Cleveland 

Baltimore 

Pittsburgh 

Louisville 

Cleveland 

Blew York 

Pittsburgh 

Boston 

New York 

New York 

New York 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Pittsburgh and Washington. 

Louisville 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Louisville 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 

Louisville and St, I ■ >uis, . . . 

Cleveland 

Nrw Y. rl: 



19 
66 

11; 

\l 

138 

52 

ti! 
01 

101 

is 

43 
1 12 
100 

Hi 

110 

107 113 



10 21 
85 KM 
In 84 
184178 
8a LS2 
ss 159 



13 
26 
12 
8 
88 

BS 
124 

83 

:js 

86 

66 

15 

13 

29 
133)150 

si L06 
K 12 

86 140 
in:; [50 

65 [% 

27 

51 

17 
Hll 

10 



Ml 


! 1 1 


. 882 


20 


49 


. 2H 1 


.,-> 


74 


.278 


31 


85 


.271 


SO 


51 


.275 


69 


S! 


.276 


55 


s; 


.275 


82 


100 


-.•; 1 


58 


118 


.874 


26 


61 


.274 


11; 


44 


278 




87 








no 


si; 


.'SK 


94 


142 


.272 


65 


77 


.■sn 



804 86 
808 18C 
808 52 
802 251 
302 220 
801 21 



111 



800 Inn 
800 201 

800 1 61 
21111 



'.".11 211 
293 --'II 
292 18 
292 28 ■ 

• 
290 1--' 
288 56 

2 a 1 la 

286 46 
285 236 
285 45 

285 1 1 1 

.282 184 
I',! 
80 

'.is 
40 
74 
lii-> 
v.- 

141 

s. 
68 
42 
106 

! 185 
89 



y> 



OFFICIAL v. I i; 

batting records — Continued, 



Name. 


Club- 


■j 

§ 

re 
3 


a 

a 

< 

903 

85 
100 
171 
866 
230 
:»:, 
52 I 
168 
192 
398 
211 
230 
108 
552 
142 
220 
82 
152 
427 
212 
151 
184 
251 
542 
855 
321 
532 
139 
74 
'.»', 
88 
(14 
183 
[20 
380 
179 
88 
llll 
97 
ISO 
70 
188 
88 
54 
125 
255 
85 
[88 

11!) 


ta 
X 

39 
15 
is 
32 
5(1 
:j!i 
42 
92 
29 
78 

28 

26 

.1 

99 

31 

82 

1 1 

23 

50 

■a: 

27 

28 

24 

128 

85 

53 

88 

29 

9 

16 

12 

8 

11 

28 

61 

27 

11 

10 

18 

15 

in 

2) 

8 

7 

12 

11 

11 

6 

9 

9 


6 
m 
re 
C 

.-,:, 

28 
87 

46 
96 
62 
71 

111 
45 

[81 

106 
56 
ill 
27 

145 

s; 

59 
1.1 
39 

109 
54 
89 
31 
64 

186 
89 
81. 

ISO 
.",1 
is 
23 
21 
15 
81 
28 
77 
41 
I'.i 
28 
22 
28 
15 
40 
14 
11 
25 
19 
10 
29 
2ll 
'.. 


a 

V 

o 

U 
V 

a, 

271 
!270 
.270 
.269 
.269 
.269 
.268 
.267 
.267 
.21111 
.268 
.265 
.265 
.262 

262 
.260 
.257 
.250 
.256 
.255 

!253 

.253 
.251 

.251 
.250 
.216 
.244 
.211 
.243 
.239 
.238 
.234 
.288 
.233 
.288 
.229 
!229 
.228 
.226 
.217 
.214 
.213 
.205 
.204 
.200 
.102 
.188 
.172 
.168 
.152 


M 

H 

87 

30 
■in 
72 
123 
80 
89 
185 
60 
207 
n. 
86 
73 
::, 
(68 
59 
70 
26 
67 
[84 
B2 

60 

47 

87 
218 
[19 

[80 
175 

41 
25 
35 
31 
17 
89 
42 
llll 
53 
24 
33 
26 
88 
21 
61 
I'.l 
14 
31 
66 

16 

80 

20 
11 


X 

c/5 

1 
2 
3 

5 
6 
6 
9 
4 
3 
11 
'J 
4 
8 

20 
1 
14 
1 

4 
2 
8 
1 

18 
II 
12 

12 
'.I 



1 


2 


1 
1 
6 
« 
1 

4 

1 



4 

in 
3 


10 
7 
2 


c/3 


R 




I'.l 

23 
27 
■I'.l 
94 
68 
76 
123 
40 
128 
105 
51 
511 

2n 

130 

4! 

63 
24 
88 

116 
53 
40 
41 
67 
180 

(HI 
Hi 
12li 
41 
28 
25 
25 

IN 

.'11 

SB 

98 

53 
2:1 
26 
28 
88 
19 
is 
18 
16 
■■•:, 

70 
26 
41 

8) 
V 


4 


V t 




1 


Clarke 




1 




ii 


<; i 




9 


Tl '1 




4 


., " 




5 


Dowd 

McCarthy 




84 


Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Washington and Cleveland.. 


8 

12 


Twitchell 


■ !l 

8 




9 






7 






41 






3 


atein . . . . 




9 






1 


Ewing 


Louisville and Baltimore.... 


2 

11 




19 




5 






I 


Buckley 


St. Louis an J Philadelphia. . 

Louisville 

Louisville and Pittsburgh... 




74 




u 




12 






84 




Washington and Baltimore.. 
Boston... 


6 


Wadsworth 


I) 




Staley 







Brooklyn and Louisville. . . . 


3 




1 




Washington 


28 


Breitenstein 


.1 




1 




Washington and Cleveland.. 







1 


i? au , ', 




6 


Young 




1 




4 




1 


™ , 







Menafee 

Clarkson 


Louisville and Pittsburgh... 


■1 

in 




1 











1 






1 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 



7' 



Fielding Record, 1894. 

FIRST B \ l M EN, 



1 



Name. 



Motz 

Anson 

Tucker 

O. Tebeau.., 
Boyle 

j Vaughn — 

I Carlright. . 
Foutz 

1 Beckley.... 

) La Chance 

j Connor . . . 

I Decker. . .. 

J Lutenburg, 

I Broutliers. 

1 Comiskey . 

) O'Rourke . 

j Doyle 

I McCarthy. 
G. Tebeau. . , 



Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 

Washington 

Brooklyn 

Pittsburgh 

Brooklyn 

New York and St. Louis 

Chicago 

Louisville 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 

Louisville, Wash., St. L 

New York 

Cincinnati 

Washington, Cleveland. 



185 
748 

1114 

101 

'.IK', 

186 
1327 

ll,V.i 
1286 
5o3 
1084 
433 
595 
1180 
558 
270 
987 
140 
101 



204 
802 

1203 

1090 

1007 
201 

1885 
710 

134!) 
528 

11113 
460 
645 

1270 
600 
800 

1080 
164 
172 



.995 
.988 
.984 
.983 
.981 
.980 
.980 
.979 
.977 
.977 
.976 
.976 
.975 
.975 
.973 
.973 
.969 
.909 
.948 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Keitz 

Quinn 

McPhee... 

Pfcffer 

Bierbauer. 
Hallman.. . 

Lowe 

Parrotl 

Childs 



10 Ward. 



Grimm,. . 
Ward. . . . 
Bonneri . 

Daly 

Radford. 

Miller... 



Baltimore 

St. Louis 

Cincinnati.. . . 

Louisville 

Pittsburgh. . . 
Philadelphia. 

Boston 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. . . 

New York. . . 
Louisville.. . . 
Washington. , 

Baltimore 

Brooklyn. ... 

Washington. , 
St. Louis. . . . 



100 


262 


844 


21 


687 


Hill 


n 1 1 


3 12 33 


719 


128 


891 


149 58 


893 


W.I 


264 


283 35 


582 


181 


808 


102 52 


822 


llfl 


314 


312 47 


703 


132 


354 


411 


57 


822 


126 


291 


884 


52 


727 


117 


308 


880 


56 


744 


186 


882 


455 


07 


854 


'21 


69 


75 


12 


140 


79 


178 


237 


HI 


452 


24 


57 


54 


in 


121 


123 


820 


858 


71 


752 


24 


62 


80 


14 


130 


18 


81 


in 


II 


91 



.966 
.954 
.940 
.939 
.936 
.938 
.930 
.928 
.924 
.921 
.'.118 
.911 
.909 
.901 
.897 
.879 



•1I1IKI) BASEMEN. 



Nash 

Mcliarr. . 

Cross 

Davis. . .. 
Dahlen... 

Lyons 

Peitz 

McGraw. 



B ,ston 

t Cleveland. . . . 
Philadelphia.. 
New York. .. . 

Chicag 

Pittsburgh... 

St. Louis 

Baltimore, . .. 



132 


199 


2,1 


84 


504 


.932 


125 


171 


2 Hi 


85 


452 


922 


100 


177 


2HI 


I" 


457 


.or" 


121 


151 


25 1 


In 


445 


,91lt 


55 


95 


187 


23 


245 


.906 


72 


120 


158 


30 


308 


.902 


13 


61 


69 


16 


145 


.896 


117 


130 


2 h; 


II 


•120 


.895 



72 



OFFICIAL AVER 



'I HT«D BASEMEN — Continued. 



U 



Shindle 

Reilly 

Flaherty. . 
Hartman . 

'M Hassamer . 
; li Latham 



Denny . 

Joyce 

Miller 

Irwin 

Gilbert..., 
O'Rourke. 



1 . 



Brooklyn 

Philadelphia 

Louisville 

Pittsburgh 

Washington 

i 'in' innati 

Louisville 

Washington 

St. Louis 

Chicago 

Brooklyn and Louisville. 
Louisville, Wash., St. L. 





: .: 








3 






V 


n 




.- 


E 






















O 


Ch 


< 


- 


n; 


J00 


...... 


SO 


27 


3ft 


lifi 


la 


:,s 


43 


76 


16 


49 


69 


nil 


..i 




«4 


79 


• 


l'.M 


163 


256 


. i 


(.J 


SI 


124 


::■.' 


'. S 


151 


ISI 


-■> 


ca 


71 


or 


BS 


OH 


90 


12S 


13 


81 


66 


61 


'1 


■•I 


::.: 


S 


1" 



472 
103 
184 

ISI 

104 
483 
840 

.-is; 
901 

Bsa 

141 

S' 



.(El 
.(81 
.FtO 
.(7S 

.8:a 

.8 T 
.PC8 
.8 5 
.KB 
.838 
.889 
.821 



SHORT STOPS. 



Glasscock. . . . 

Jennings 

Richardson. . . 

I Smith 

I Corcoran . . . 

McKean 

Allen 

Coniiaughton. 

Ely 

Dahlen 

Long 

( Sullivan 

I Irwin 

Murphy 

Shiebeck 

Fuller 

Pfeffer 

Radford 

Selbach 



Pittsburgh 

Baltimore 

Louisville 

< up lnn:ui 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

St. Louis 

(IgO 

Boston 

Washington an J Phila. . .. 

New York 

Pittsburgh arid Washuign. 

New York 

Louisville 

Washington 

Washington 



196 
:« 
2.% 
23 1 
282 
278 

93 

60 
879 
191 
223 
199 
122 
112 
133 
811 

30 
12! 

52 



6S0 
S66 
6411 
82:, 

?.: 

?r 
811. 
183 
B05 
600 
865 
483 
88 ! 
894 

408 

591 
100 
B64 
127 



.984 
.928 
.923 
.818 
.813 
.1.11 
.'JUT 
.901 
.S'.'H 
.896 
.893 
.898 
.898 
.ss| 
.888 
.879 
.S77 
.851 
.818 






Dungan 

Griffin 

) Hamilton... 
I Thompson.. 

Weaver 

McAlcer. .. . 

Kclley 

Brodie 

Shock 

Burns 

Hogau 

j Blake 

"J O'Connor... 
Delehanty. ... 

Smith 

Tiernan 

I kmovan 



Louisville and t hi 

Brooklyn 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 

Louisville and Pittsburgh 

and 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

St. Louis 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

New Vork 

Pittsburgh 



18 


30 


3 


1 


84 


106 


806 


ia is 


888 


181 


868 


18 IB 


8114 


102 


168 


11 


7 


181 


85 


69 


8 


3 


70 


01 


173 


10 


9 


192 


129 


874 


111 


IB 


808 


129 


811 


11 


I'.i 


341 


84 


89 


11 


6 


ion 




212 


16 II 


212 


29 


48 


5 


8 


51 


73 


122 


17 


9 


148 


81 


85 


H 


II 


99 


*:, 


884 


81 


HI 


2(11 


186 


OJM 


is 


2(1 


809 


112 


170 


11 


13 


184 


138 


867 


84 


21 


812 



.970 
.908 
.9(11 
,961 
.1157 
.953 
.951 
.944 
.948 
.942 
.941 



.935 
.933 
.932 



OFFICIAL AVRRAOXS. 

OUTFIELDERS — Continued, 



n 



Namk. 



KT 



1G Dowd . 

L8 l: tdford 

j j Ewing 

1J | [Selbach 

20 Duffy 

21 Burke 

^ \ Stenzel 

i i anavan 

83 Holliday. 

%> , i Brown 

•"iJ McCarthy 

JKl l'urkett 

\ Van HrJtrcn. 

* Shugai t 

j Abbey 

/ Hassamcr, . . . 

BS Turner 

gj McCarthy 

(Smith 

| Ryan 

Lange 

Twitchell 

Hoy 

Treadway 

Clark 

Frank 

( i, Tebean 

1 Mui phy 

I Virtue 

Bannon 

Wilmot 

O'Rourkc 

Decker 

Coolcy 

Nicol 

Anderson 



Club. 



St. Louis 

Baltimore 

Washington 

land 

Washington 

Boston 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

Cincinnati 

< -incinnati 

Louisville 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

NewYork 

St. Louis 

Washington 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Louisville 

i lil« ago 

Chicago 

I ouisville 

I incinnati. 

Brooklyn 

Louisville 

St. Louis 

Wash'n and < Cleveland. . . . 

New York 

( Heveland 

Boston 

Chicago 

Louisville, Wash'n, St. L. 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Louisville 

Ivn 



o 

- 


3 

o 


l/> 


O 


$ 








u 




o 


A 


< 


UJ 


H" 


115 


201 


18 


16 


233 


1ST 


220 


27 


I'.i 


266 


»o 


80 


8 


8 


41 


52 


91 


7 


8 


10(1 


r« 


IBS 


7 


[8 


173 


m 


818 


28 


2S 


301 


188 


289 


16 


28 


.'|i is 


! ; 1 1 


817 


22 


:m 


3011 


:i: 


I'.Jl 


I" 


IS 


219 


i-ji 


24i 


28 


'■!') 


298 


ISO 


82? 


23 


sa 


3X3 


26 


4(1 


7 


6 


58 


i-.'i 


242 


18 


24 


284 


\m 


809 


28 


38 


870 


1!'.' 


270 


28 


27 


820 


129 


841 


26 


38 


403 


6H 


102 


10 


11 


123 


77 


148 


7 


15 


105 


124 


888 


80 


82 


848 


89 


04 


2 


7 


78 


108 


222 


28 


26 


271 


110 


87fi 


80 


33 


311 


51 


104 


11 


18 


181 


l-s 


322 


87 


11 


890 


122 


:.:, 1 


26 


36 


830 


711 


188 


14 


28 


203 


i i 


161) 


11 


23 


193 


87 


1*2 


K 


26 


210 


20 


82 


8 


5 


40 


20 


88 


4 


6 


48 


127 


248 


42 


1! 


S2i ; 


186 


262 


17 


16 


325 


is 


84 


2 


6 


42 


80 


MS 


9!1 


75 


S8 


78 


1114 


88 


28 


88 


8| 7 


HI 


i: 


21 


n 


i: 


27 



I .931 
.928 
.927 
.921 
.924 
.928 

I .922 
.918 
.918 
.918 
.914 
.914 
.912 
.911 
.911 
.910 
.910 
.909 
.908 
.904 
.904 
.903 
.900 
.895 
.891 
880 
.880 
.879 
.875 
.875 
.874 
.858 
.857 

84 i 

.837 

77 



CATCHERS' averages. 









.._: 










t/1 


i 
































































N \JTIi. 


Curs. 


ft 








a 


^ 


« u 


M 






F 


o 






-: 

V 


*3 


s< 


























n 




IT. 










tt 






■z 


t 


-, 


w 


- 


H 


a. 


1 






17 
06 


2S.-> 
182 
249 


107 
88 

72 


16 

11 

is 


13 
12 


l-J! 

238 
351 


.931 


'■ 






.924 


8 




Philadelphia, St. Louis... 


.914 




106 

us 


364 

"it 


98 

.VI 


24 
22 


19 
16 


508 
8T0 


Oil 


4 






.900 



74 . i i I \I AVERAGES. 

CA rCHERS 1 RECM ir i i~ Con tin UetL 



Name. 



Merrkt 
Schriver... . 
Grimm 

Miller ... 

Murphy . 

Farrcll. .. 
Kittredge . . 
' Vaughn . , 

Dailey.. . . 

Oanzel 

Sugden..... 

Earle 

Twineham . 
O'Connor . . 
McGuire .. . 
S Clarke . . . 
1 Ryan . . . . 

IVii/ 

Tenny 

Wilson 

Weaver . . . . 
Kinslow... , 

Grady 

IDugdale. . . . 



Club. 



:. Cin. , 
Chicago 

\ Lite 

St. Louis 

nnatl 

New York 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

Boston 

Pittsburgh , 

Brooklyn and Louisville., 

St. Louis 

Cleveland 

Washington , 

Baltimore 

Boston , 

St. Louis 

Boston 

New York 

Louisville and Pittsburgh 
Brooklyn 

Iclphia 

Washington 











in 




















s 












_ 






'« 


A 


u 


9 

n 


2 


wj T> 


u 


ti 




■a 


O vi 















a 


i. 


< 


Ul d. 


h 


m 


177 


73 


10 13 


278 


si; 


.'.II 


08 


84 18 


184 


RS 


262 


Ml 


29 16 


111 


811 


138 


:n; 


12 III 


196 


, 


197 


O'.i 


29 :, 


SOU 


KB 


lid 


IMS 


(1 Mi 


686 


50 


200 


■111 


20 18 


282 


11 


IBS 


48 


19| 8 


225 


58 


217 


62 


21 'iT 


817 


:,:, 


|.".S 


57 


24 10 


279 


::n 


ini 


28 


181 7 


151 


31 


S'.l 


4S 


6 


18 


150 


31 


117 


86 


9 


is 


209 


42 


160 


87 


12 


2li 


229 


102 


288 


11(1 


3I> 


US 


171 


22 


Mi 


SI 


in 


fl 


i ■:.- 


4!) 


166 


49 


IS 


IS 


251 


88 


158 


53 


18 


11 


229 


IK 


55 


1S 


11 


8 


B! 


3U 


118 


22 


20 


9 


170 


80 


88 


87 


11 


15 


ill 


51 


III 


47 


19 


28 




88 


nn 


80 


21 


■-'II 


172 


81 1 


75 


88 


■.'" 


in 


148 



.s'.ir, 
.891 
.890 
.887 
.887 

.ssr 

.883 
S .880 
.880 
.878 
174 
.873 
.870 
.860 
.857 
.856 
.856 
.851 



.815 
798 
761 

720 



pitchers' record, in alphabetical order — 1894. 



Namk. 



Club. 



6 i u ! 






'A 



m 






Brcitenslein. . 
Colcolough .. 

Cnppy 

Carsey 

Clarkson... .. 
Chamberlain. 

Dwyer 

Daub 

Esper 

Ehret 

Gumbcrt 

Griffith 

German 



St. Louii 

Pittsburgh 

' lleveland 

Philadelphia 

St. Louis 

tnati 

Cincinnati 

v 11 

Wash'ton <fc Balt're. 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 



New York 



.651 n 
.5889 
.588 J 

.808 8 

.500 7 

■ 
.500 
.436 

.OKI 

.656 
.471 



3. (Hi 
4.87 
8.24 
3. SI 
1.111 
8.70 
1.13 
8.70 

4.SK 

4.17 
1.87 
8.59 

3.53 



102 



.902 
.844 
.916 
.831 
,794 
.729 
.MS 
.O. I 
.999 

.SI IS 

.909 
.901 

.K12 



off-ici \i. WERAOfife. 



75 



vi ti'iikks' record -Contimud. 



(Meason 

Hemming. . . 
Hawke 

Hutchinson . 

Hawley 

Inks 

Killen 

Knell 

Kennedy.. .. 

Menafee 

Mercer 

Meckin 

Maul 

Mill lane 

McMahon.. . 

McGill 

Nichols 

Parrott 

Rusie 

Stratton 

Stockdalc. . . 

Stivetts 

stein 

Staley 

Sullivan 

Terry 

Taylor 

Weyhing. . .. 
Wads worth.. 
Wcstcrvelt.. . 
Young 



Club. 



St. Louis & Baltm're, 

l.Xville & Haltim're.. 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Ball 'moreA L'sville, 

Pittsburgh 

Louisvilh 



Brooklyn 

Lou'ville & Pltts'gh 

Washington 

New York 

Washington 

Bait. & Cleveland..., 

Baltimore... 

Chicago 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

New York 

I.on'villc&Chicago.. 

Washington 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

Boston 

Wash. & Cleveland.. 

Chicago i 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 

Louisville 

New York 

Cleveland 



.790 
.458 



V '• 


a 




b a 






•°f. 




r 


>*- — 






o p. 


> 


-v 


.iW 


t» 




c o 


wi 


t 




u "3 


U 




' ~ 


c 


B. 


S3 


X 


31 J 


50 


3!l 




140 


76 


.311 


58 


50 


.314 


125 


DO 


80S 


U1 


Hi 


m 


;r. 


81 


.■in.", 


83 


K 




(17 


or 


■m 


134 


mi 


.808 


85 


!* 


308 


105 


57 


.2na 


147 


121 


.am 


m 


:u 


■iff, 


80 


4 1 


.2C.ii 


10!) 


55 


.391 


m 


r.r 


m 


108 


Cf 


,m 


121) 


«1 


.858 


IK) 


,'IH 


.300 


52 


a 


.868 


«'.) 


(- 


.300 


1(H) 


ss 


.280 


162 


w 


.344 


r>5 


29 


820 


1)7 


28 


.334 


HI 


4.", 


.SSI 


85 


78 


.324 


101 


78 


.::i;n 


07 


5H 


.■::>-, 


62 


28 


.-•'.13 


100 


1IHI 



&? 



Tie games — Cuppy, 1; Dwyer, 1- Dan 
1; Inks,!: Meckin, 4; Nichrls, 1; Stein 



b, 1; Ehret 
1; Terry, 1: 



.841 
BM 
Rffl 
710 
.708 
.8-10 
in 'J 
,688 
.771 
.'.M 
.852 
.7118 
785 
.740 
son 
.840 
858 
.824 

jm 

'.131 
.825 
.813 
.785 

741 
.714 
.782 
.790 

845 
.703 
,854 
.802 



1; Gnmbert, 1; Hawley, 
Taylor, 1; Westcrvelt, 1. 









June 

Sept 
3,24,28 


July 
1. 1, 5 

,ir is 


— is . -. 1 








■ i 


ft 

a a 

'x, 
(J 


= id -~* Bof« 3 


A* - bi - 

3*3 e 


- — ■ -— -* 






C t/j 


.8 .$ 










i". CO 

•-o at- 


c 
c 

u 


8 J 


^ -' M X 
xV. >, 






r - ■" 


.8 .8 

( - -^ 




c 
rt 

u 

G 


CO .0" 

>, . be 






i- QC 


V 1 * 


8 .« 


rt -, 3 co 


bit 
c ja 










|«-i5 

S - Eft - 




•3 - — J - 

8 S 


C -,- M . 


c 

rt 


8*8 
Si," 5 


8 


C 50" Q. .T 

-.. ; x_: 


y -r « ^," 


CO b- 

2 3 


Sols- 

< -:• 


o 

S -i 

1 


2 ? 


3-» iS 
t- 






so =5 

— ., .• < ■ 

• 8 


— . . = o. 


-5| 




= - L' = 

- — .< ■ 

* ~i 


8 8 


3 a 


.* .8 






C > 








it •" 

= !--■;) 


5 © 


„5 .8 


a 

>■ 

r- O 
O 
M 

23 


S".8*t 


» F-« « _' 

5 - < A 




.2 8 


gets* 


g«?s 

1 — 1 ^<, - 


e 

- 2 




» ii 


< V 
«3 


» 8 


§52 &rf 


* v -^ r* 

3S l - 


a 








J 




•0 

« 

b 

G 




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c c 

c 
O 


> 

'3 
p 


d 

u 
a 








9 
- 





This Trade Mark 



-£*eW 




A 



-£*3- 



Trje Star)<Jarc] of Corpparisoij 
The World Over, 

and which has stood the test of years, will be stamped in the 
future, as in the past, on all goods manufactured by us and 
will guarantee each article, from the cheapest to the highest 
priced, as the very best that can be produced for the money. 

But this additional Trade Mark — 




will be placed on the " Highest Quality " goods in theii 
respective line and will be a further guarantee that the article so 
stamped represents the very highest grade of material, work- 
manship and finish, and the most perfect in design our past 
experience enables us to produce. 

Our Complete Catalogue of "SPRING AND SUHnER SPORTS" 
Mailed FREE to any Address. 

A. Q. 5PALDINQ €r F3R05., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



SPALDING'S COMPLETE UNIFORMS. 

y 

Our line ot flannels for Base Ball Uniforms consists of five qualities and 
over forty different patterns. Each grade is kept tip to the highest point 

of excellence, and patterns changed 
every season ; base ball players may 
be assured that whatever grade of 
uniform is selected, it will be the very 
best that can be furnished for the 
money. On orders for complete sets 
i tf^nQf?Jf V * ^v °^ ""iforms, we make no charge for 
L 'jV ■ /■ _[; ' £ l^n ^\ lettering; on orders for single suits 
we charge Fiue Cents per letter. Spe- 
cial measurement blanks, samples of 
flannel and belt webbing for all the 
following uniforms furnished on ap- 
plication. 

No. O- Uniform, complete, 
Plain Pants $ | 4.O0 

No. I . Uniform, complete, 
Plain Pants | | .OO 

No. 2. Uniform, complete, 
Plain Pams 8.40 

No. 3, Uniform, complete. 

Plain Pants 6.00 

No. 4- Uniform, complete, 

/# 'vjjQ* IIST Plain Pants 4.25 

/jf 3FF% I No. 5» Uniform, complete. 

Plain Pants 2.75 

On No. o Uniform, Padded 

PfttttS extra I .OO 

On Nos. i, 2, 3 and 4 Uni- 
forms, Padded Pants .75 



OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE OF 

SPUING and SUMMER SPORTS, 

HANDSOMELY ILLUSTRATED, 

And Containing Every Requisite for Athletic SpOrt8, mailed 
dec to -my address. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 





SPdLDINQ'J CATCHER./' HITTJ. 

Made in Plights and Lefts, and without Throwing Gloves. 

I Highest Quality Mitt, made «> 

]CZt&tflQj ( ^ e ^ nesC selected Ie;tth r, 

MmrwiTv ^\ heavily padded and laced :< I 

around Each, $7.50 

The "Morrill" Mitt. 

Special design, made of finest drab buckskin, heavily 
padded ; a soft, easy fitting mitt Each, $6-00 

No. 5/0- Spalding's League Mitt, finest selected hog- 
skin, laced back and well padded ; a strong, durable 
mitt Each, $5.00 

No. OX. Spalding's " Decker Patent" Mitt, hand of 
soft deerskin, back of selected hogskin, laced, and sole 
leather reinforce on back for additional protection, 
well made and padded ; the original catchers' mitt. 

Each, $3.50 

No, O. Spalding's Catchers' Mitt, hand of soft tanned 

No. OX. deerskin, back-piece selected hogskin, laced back and 

well padded Each, $3.00 

No. A* Spalding's Amateur Mitt, extra quality leather, 
heavily padded, lace back .Each, $2.00 

No. 3. Spalding's Practice Mitt, hand of grain leather, 
back of sheepskin, laced all around and well padded. 
^^ Each, $ | .00 

No. 3. 

Boys' Mitts. 

No. OXP. Spalding's "Decker Patent " Boys' Mitt, 
hand-piece of velvet tanned deerskin, back of fine 
hogskin, sole leather reinforced patent back for extra 
protection to fingers, laced and heavily padded. 

Each, $2.00 

No. 2. Spalding's Hoys' Mitt, tanned buckskin, laced 
back and nicely padded Each, $ | .50 

No. 4. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, front and back grain 
leather, hand-piece yellow tanned sheepskin, laced 

back and well padded. Each, 50c. 

No. 2. No. 5. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, leather front hand-piece; 
a strong and durable glove for boys Each, 25C. 

Our Complete Illustrated Catalogue Mailed Free. 

ft. Q. SpAldin* & Bro?., CH,CA ™' E ^; L A R D K ELPH,A • 







Spalding's Base Ball Goods. 

Spalding's Basemen's Mitts. 

Made in RjgfatS and Lefts. 

--4J JE) dig, • Base Mitt, finest velvet 

*7jfe £n//miVm tanned buckskin, per- 

No. 3X. (^MW^Sr^^i fectly padded, highest 

*^^"^ Each, $3.00 

No. AX. Spalding's Basemen's Mitt t soft tanned 

brown leather, tine felt padding, made in rights and 

lefts Each, $2-00 

No. 5 X. Spalding's Basemen's Mitt, mad of special 
JNO. 4A. gold tanned leather, well padded, rights and lefts. 

Each, $ I .OO 

No. 6X» Spalding's Boys' Basemen's Mitt, same as our No. 5X, but smaller 

sizes Each, SOC . 

Spalding's Basemen's Mitt. 

In Rights and Lefts. 

Basemen's Mitt, finest 
velvet tanned buck- 
is," BX /*£?^F / **'**** 1 -5?' skin, laced edge, per- 
- »**. ^t^l ^™« ^ fectly padded, 
^*^^r highest quality. 
Each, $4.00 

Spalding's Infielders' Clove. 

In Rights and Lefts. 

. i /SN/y. » Infielders' Glove, finest 
m&6 mMwflultim velvet tanned buck- 
No. 2X. (y£f^H^»^\ **"!», perfectly pad- 
^— ^y"**** ^ Js ded, highest quality. 
Each, $3.00 
No. X. Spalding's Amateur Infielders' Glove. 

Each, $ 1 .50 

Spalding's Body Protectors. 

Gray's Patent. 
Made of rubber and inflated with air. The only safe and 
reliable Body Protector. 

Each. 

No. OO. Umpire Body Protector $ ( O.OO 

No. O. League " " I O.OO 

No. I . Amateur " *• 6.00 

No. 2. Boys' H M 5.00 

Our complete Catalogue of " Spring and Summer Sports," mailed free to 
any address. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 
New York. Chicago. Philadelphia. 




SPALDING'S BASE BALL GOODS. 

Spalding's Club Bat Bags. 



No. o. 
No. |. 

No. 2. 



No. 2. 
League Club Bae,, sole leather, for 18 bats. . . . 

Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 24 bats 

Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 12 bats 



Individual Bags. 



Each. 

$15.00 
5.00 
4.O0 



No. 02. Bach. 

No. O I . Sole Leather Bag, for two bats $4.00 

No. 02. Heavy Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at both ends I .50 

No. 03. Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at one end I .OO 




Athletes' Uniform Bag. 

For carrying Base Ball and other Uni- 
forms, made to roll, and will not wrinkle or 
soil same, separate compartment for shoes. Each. 

No. I, Canvas $2.50 

No. 2. Leather 3.50 



Spalding's Bases. 

Three Bases to a set. Per Skt. 

. O. League Club' Bases, extra quality, quilted, 



■ith spikes $7.50 

No. 1 1 Best Canvas liases, not quilted, with spikes b.OO 

No. 2, Ordinary Canvas Bases, with spikes 4.00 

Home Plates. 

No. I. Robber Home Plate, League regulation, Each. 

complete, with spikes $7.50 

No. 2- Marble Home Plates, best quality 2.00 

No 3. Plate for Pitcher's Box 5,00 

Spalding's Indicators. Each. 

No. O. Umpire Indicators $0.50 

No. I. Scoring Tablets 35 

No. o. 




Our Complete Catalog ae of " Spring and Summer Sports" Mailed 
Free to Any Address. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK. CHICACO, PHILADELPHIA.; 



Spalding's Supporters and Bandages. 

FOR ALL ATHLETIC SPORTS. 




Mm!; rr IN'S 

No. I, Stocking Supporter 
No. 2. Stocking Supporter 



Supporters. 

No. |, Morton's Supporter. 

N<>. 2. Rliehn's Supporter 

No. 3. Dare's Supporter 

No. I OO. Wrist Supporter 

No. 20O. Wrist Supporter 

No. H. Ankle Supporter Pair 



Each. 

$ .35 
.50 
I.OO 
.25 
.50 
1.25 
.50 
.35 



Elastic Bandages. 





Suspensories. 

CHICAGO SUSPENSORIES. 

No. 70. Non-Elastic Hands < 

No.7|. Elastic Buttock Bands... 

No. 72. Full Elastic Hands 



No. 735-j. Elastic Hands, silk sack 



No. 75. Elastic Hands, satin top piece 

No. 76. Silk Elastic Bands, satin trimmings 

OLD POINT COMFORT. 

Elastic Bands, adjusting buckles 

Elastic Hands, silk sack and trimmings 

Silk Elastic Hands, satin trimmings, fine silk sack 

Scud for our complete Catalogue of " Spring and Summer Sports 
somcly illustrated, and the most comprehensive Catalogue ever 
Mailed free. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 
New York. Ch cago. Philadelphia. 



No. 2. 
No. 3. 
No. 4, 



$ .25 

.50 

.75 

I.OO 

1.25 

2.00 

SI.OO 
1.50 
2.00 

," hand- 
issued. 



— 




Spaldincs Uniform Goods. 

BASE BALL BELTS. 

Worsted Web Belts. 

2% inches wide. Each 

No. oo. No. OO. Special League Belt $0.50 

No. 2. Worsted Web, double leather 

covered buckle 50 

No. 47. Worsted Web, single leather 
covered buckle .50 

Cotton Web Belts. 

■zYi inches wide. 
No. 23. Double strap, nickel buckle... ,25 
No. 4. Single strap, leather mounted, 

plain buckles . | 5 

No. 4. , 

Base Ball Stockings. pair. 

No. CO. Heavy, ribbed, linen sole $ | .25 

I No. 3/0. Extra Heavy, plain or striped.... 1.50 

I \ I HI No. I. All Wool, heavy | .(JO 

H ■''IB Hi " 2 " All Wo.,1, medium 75 

•J "l/ik tB No. 3. Wool, ordinary weight 5fl 

fy ^r AW No. 4, Cotton Stockings 23 

§/ J J N0.5/O. Scotch Wool 4.00 

<X 3/0. 3. No. 4/0. Irish Wool 2.5C 

Spalding's Base Ball Shoes. p "*- 

No. 2/0. The Spalding Highest 

-W Quality Base Ball Shoe $7.50 

//■' SB No. I /O. Finest Calf, hand-sewed, 
•f^ with plates 5.00 

R^/P\ ?A ^"- 1^- ^' ne Calf, hand -sewed, with 

JfC' H plates 4.00 

£Jj -^S*^*?^" No. 3P, Calf, with plates 3.50 

*~^^^ — - N0.3. Calf, no plates 3.00 

Our complete Catalogue of Spring and Summer Sports, Athletic Goods and 
Uniforms, for all outings, mailed free to any address. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

MEW YORK. CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA. 



L_ 



SPALDING'S CATCHERS' MASKS. 




No. 3/0. 



No. o. 



No. 2/0. 



No. o. 



Black Enameled Wire. 

it? fiististitlA Sun Pr0,ectin 2 Mask, 
No. ^/O.JPIpfOfXIBP black enameled wire, Each 

(Sy^-^Z^ highest quality $5.00 

No. 3/0. Spalding's Neck Protecting Mask, black 

enameled wire 3.50 

No. 2/0. Spalding's Special League Mask, heavy 

black enameled wire 3.00 

No. O. Spalding's Regulation Mask, heavy wire, 
black enameled. 2.50 




Catchers' Masks. 

Bright Wire. 
'• O. Spalding's Regulation 

No. A. Spalding's Amateur Mask 

No. B. Spalding's Amateur Boys' Mask, same as 
No. A, in boys' sizes 

No. C. Spalding's Youths' Mask, without head or 
chin piece 

No. D. Spalding's Boys* Mask, without head or 
chin piece 

No. E. Spalding's Boys' Mask, lighter wire, with- 
out head or chin piece 



Each. 
$2.00 
I.SO 

I.OO 

.78 

.50 

.23 



Spalding's Shoe Plates. 



No. O. Hand Forged Toe Plates.. 
No. 2"0. Hand Forged Heel Plates. 
No. | a Professional Toe Plates... 
No. I H. Professional Heel Plates. . 
No. 2. Amateur Shoe Plates 



Per Pair. 
5O0. 
50o. 
25o. 
25o. 
lOc. 




Pitchers' Toe Plates. 

Made of heavy brass and worn on toe of shoe. 
A valuable assistant in pitching. Pair. 

Rights and Lefts 50o. 



Our Catalogue of " Spring and Summer Sports," handsomely illus- 
trated, and containing every requisite for athletio 
sports, mailed free to any address. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



SPALDING'S TRADE MARK BATS. 




Men's Model, made of finest selected 
timber, oil finish, and in three approved Each. 
models, A, li and C. Each bat in sep- 
arate baa. Highest Quality $1.00 

Boys' Model, same quality and finish, 
in three patterns, A, fj and C | .00 



^zzm 



No, 3/0. Each. 

No. 3/0. Spalding's Special Black End League Players' Wagon 

Tongue Ash Bat, patent rough handle 1 .00 

No. O'X. Spalding's Special Black End Axlctrce Bat, fine straight 

grained ash .50 

No. 2/X. Spalding's Black End Antique Finish Bat, extra quality 

Ash 25 



No. 4. Spalding's Black End Willow Bat, highl 
very light 



and 



.50 



Spalding's Trade-Mark Boys' Bats. 



No. OXB. Spalding's Special Black End Axle tree Boys' Bat; Each. 

length, 30 and 32 inches $0.25 

No. 56. Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, stained and 

polished, gilt stripes ,IO 

No. 53. Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, polished, gilt 

stripes ,IO 

No. 54. Spalding's Black End Boys' Maple Bat, black stripes, 26 

to 28 inches .05 



Our complete Catalogue of " Spring and Summer Sports," handsomely 

illustrated, and containing every requisite for athletic 

sports, mailed free to any address. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



SPALDING'S UNIFORM GOODS. 



V 

s 

J— Sh 


fc 





Base Ball Shirts. 

No. O quality Shirts, regular styles. 
Each, $6.00 



Lace Front. Button Front. 




No. I quality Shirts, ' 
No. 2 quality Shirts, 

No. 3 quality Shirts, ' 

No. 4 quality Shirts, ' 

Base Ball Pants. 



No. O quality Pauls, 
No. I " 

No. 2 
No. 3 
No. 4 " 



Plain. 
S5.0O 
3.75 
2.7o 
2.00 
1.35 



Padded Pants. BaSe Bal1 Ca P S ' 

Chicago, College, Eton, Skull, Jockey and Boston Stylus. 

No. O quality, best quality. 
No. I quality, lighter flannel, 
No. 2 quality, good flannel, 
No. 3 quality, ordinary flannel, 
No. 4 quality, light flannel, 

Chicago Style. . 




5.00 
3.75 
2.75 
2.00 



$6.0O 
4.50 
3.50 
2.75 
2.00 



Each. 

$I.OO 
.75 
.65 
50 
.40 



Score Books Pocket Sizes. 

No. I . Paper Cover, 7 games, . . . Each, I Oc. 

No. 2. Board Cover, 22 games, . 25c. 

No. 3. Board Cover, 46 games; ... " 50c. 

Club Sizes. 

No. 4. Board Cover, 30 games, . . . Each, $ I .OO 

No. 5. Cloth Cover, 60 games, ... " 1.75 
No. 6. Cloth Cover, 90 games, ..." 2.50 

No. 7. Cloth Cover, 120 games, ... " 3.00 
Score Cards, per doz., 25c. 

Our Catalogue of Spring and Summer Sports and Athletic Uniforms, mailed 
free to any address. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

MEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 




SPALDING'S 

TRADE MARK BA6E BALLS. 

The Spalding League 

Ball) adopted by the National 
League and American Association 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 
Warranted to last a full g:imc with- 
out ripping or losing its elasticity or 
shape. 



No, 


I . 


No. 


O. 


No. 


IB 


No, 


2. 


No. 


3. 


No. 


5. 


No. 


2B 


No. 


7. 


No. 


7B 


No 


II. 


No. 


6. 


No. 


14. 


No. 


8. 


No. 


9B 


No. 


13. 


No, 


15. 


No. 


16. 



Official League Ball, 
Double Scam Ball, 
Boys' League Ball, 
Professional Ball, 
Amateur Ball, 
King of the Diamond, 
Boys* Professional, 
Boys' Favorite Ball, 
League Junior Ball, 
Bouncer Ball, 
Victor Ball, 
Boys' Amateur Ball, .... 

(All of tli" above in separate Iiijx and scaled.) 
Eureka Ball, 
Boys' Lively Ball, 
Rocket Ball, 
Dandy Ball, 
Boss, 4-piece Ball, 

(The above not in separate box.) 



Each. 

$1.50 

1.50 

I.OO 

I.OO 

.75 

.50 

.50 

.25 

.25 

.25 

.20 

.15 

.10 
.10 
.05 
.05 
.05 



OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE OF 

Spring and Summer Sports, Athletic and Uniform Goods, 

The most complete catalogue of its kind ever issued and mailed free to 
any address. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.. 

New York. Chicago. Philadelphia.